What Can Pinterest Do For You? My Clients’ Real Results (August Analytics Reports)

What can Pinterest do for your biz or blog? Check out my client's real results! (August 2018 Reports).

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links, which means I may receive a small commission, at no cost to you, if you make a purchase through a link, which I’ve indicated as affiliate links in parentheses, like this: (affiliate link).  


I’m going to be real transparent with you all right now and do something I’ve never done before.

I’m going to publicly show you a few of my clients’ Pinterest stats (anonymously, of course). These are real people and real accounts. The growth is real, as are the declines.

My purpose in showing you all this is so that you can see what Pinterest is capable of. You can see the growth client’s get when we start putting time and effort into their profiles and original content. You can see the ups and downs over time. You get to see REAL results.

I’m a big fan of being REAL with you all. I’m never going to promise you 30 day explosive results or overnight success. Ask anyone who has ever worked with me and they’ll tell you that I always recommend:

-a consistent daily pinning strategy
-a foundation of niche relevant boards
SEO SEO SEO in all the places
new boards monthly
-new original content WEEKLY
-a serious time and effort investment of at least 3-6 months. (3 months to see growth potential, 6 months MINIMUM to see results)

You can’t half-a** this. If you want serious results, you have to put in serious work. My motto is “Quality in enough Quantity, Consistently over Time”.

If you AREN’T seeing ANY growth, ANY results, and you are ready to GIVE UP on Pinterest – or if results/growth is just slow as molasses –  then it’s likely you have an issue with one or more of the following:

Quality: How’s your board topics, pin content, original content, pin visuals, pin captions, SEO, etc.?
Quantity: How many pins you are pinning of other’s and of your own content? How many boards do you have? etc.
Consistency: How often are you pinning? Is it sporadic? Is it spread out throughout the day or all at once? etc.
Time: Have you been trying your current strategy for two weeks? Two months? or Two years? When was the last time you changed up your strategy? When did you start really putting time and effort into Pinterest?

But I digress…

My point is, it’s one of my core values to be real with the information I give my clients and readers. So, to that end, check out these clients’ account stats!


Client A

Client A came to me with a Pinterest that had been run by an entity in India. (No offense to residents/natives of India, that’s just where her management company was based). The entity had very little understanding of how Pinterest worked and NOTHING was optimized. Her pins were very low quality, not optimized for Pinterest sizing, some images were not used legally, etc. She had been using them for a year! She needed a complete rehaul of her account, with niched boards, SEO, and better pin visuals/descriptions. We implemented that in July and in August focused on pushing out her original content and pinning daily. Here are her results:

Charts

Profile Graphs

Website Graphs


Client B

Client B came to me with a similar situation. She needed a complete rehaul as well. We did a POWER UP and then moved her into Ongoing Management in month two. We’ve created branded pins for her and have been using Tailwind (affiliate link) to pin daily, keep an eye on her top performing boards, and pushing her original content to tribes. As a basically brand new account, growth will be slow, but look at how her profile views jumped from essentially nothing to over 176K from May to August! She’s also starting to accumulate clicks to her website – low numbers, but you have to start somewhere. Pinterest has a snowball effect…

Charts

Profile Graphs

Website Graphs


Client C

Client C came to me with a beautiful Pinterest account that was already performing well, but not getting her many clicks back to her website. She needed a little cleanup as far as SEO goes, and also needed a little board “restructuring” to bring in some more niche topics and to consolidate boards with duplicate content. We also began designing pins for her with a consistent branded look. She began to see an increase in clicks to her site and we’ve since been experimenting with promoted pins to get her even MORE traffic! Take a look…

Charts

Profile Graphs

Website Graphs

Now, you might notice in some of her graphs that things look a little wonky around the end of June – this is where we switched from using Board Booster to using Tailwind and things had to recalibrate a bit.


I’ve got loads more examples, but you should be able to see from the above that no matter where you are starting in your Pinterest journey there is *usually* room for improvement and growth! You can also check out this link to see typical results you can expect when using Tailwind (affiliate link)– which is the scheduling platform we recommend (and use for our own clients; we’ve used other platforms and Tailwind simply blows them all out of the water!)

So, how can Pinterest help you? Well, it can get you:

  • more organic brand awareness/exposure
  • more traffic to your website/blog
  • more authority in your chosen niche
  • more sales/readers/followers/raving fans

and if you need help, I’m here for you!

  • Got a quick question? Comment below or pop over to our FB Group.
  • Need an account rehaul/clean up or some optimizing done? Check out our Power Ups! (I’ve literally built nearly 100 Pinterest accounts from scratch ya’ll)
  • Need someone to take the stress away and just magically make it all better? Check out our Management options!

And if you just need a shoulder to cry on, a hot latte, and a hug – because business is HARD sometimes – well, I can empathize with you, Google nearby support groups,. and commiserate with you via Zoom if you’d like 😉

Til next time,

xoxo


Tailwind Visual Marketing Suite

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Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

The Ultimate Guide To Making The Switch From Board Booster To Tailwind

Switching from Board Booster to Tailwind: Best Practices

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links, which means I may receive a small commission, at no cost to you, if you make a purchase through a link, which I’ve indicated as affiliate links in parentheses, like this: (affiliate link).  


The Pinterest Marketing world was shaken up quite a bit in late June of this year when Board Booster shut down amid talks with Pinterest regarding partner status. Unfortunately for all of us that loved Board Booster for it’s unique features, we’ve been left to adjust our pinning strategy to either manual pinning only or to one of the official Pinterest pin-scheduler partners (say THAT five times fast!). That leaves Hootsuite, Buffer, and Tailwind (affiliate link – Yes, I’m an affiliate now ya’ll – that’s how much I’m a believer!) as our current options.

Of these three, Tailwind is by far the most robust and will be the easiest transition for previous Board Booster users. You can accomplish many of the same things with Tailwind as you did with Board Booster, just the mechanics of it are a bit different. Honestly, what took me the most time to get used to was the user interface of Tailwind. Once you learn where everything is and how it works and/or replaces previous Board Booster features (may they rest in peace), using Tailwind to manage your pinning strategy will be just as easy as it was before.

I’ve even discovered a few new tricks with Tailwind that make sourcing pins for your scheduler way easier than it ever was in Board Booster.

The biggest plus for making the switch though? Tailwind as an official partner (affiliate link) doesn’t violate the TOS of Pinterest and so there is no risk of your account or pins being penalized for being published through this program. And with Pinterest putting extra focus on new, fresh, pins (versus repins), Tailwind provides some security there too – whenever you pin the same pin to multiple boards via Tailwind, each instance of that pin is a “fresh” pin – not a copy (repin) of the original. Mischief managed! (Harry Potter fans unite!)

Okay, so ALL that said, HOW do you take that lovely streamlined easy peasy pinterest strategy you had all figured out in Board Booster and transfer it over to Tailwind without giving yourself a grade A migraine in the process?

Introducing…. THE BLUE FAIRY STUDIOS ULTIMATE GUIDE TO MAKING THE SWITCH FROM BOARD BOOSTER TO TAILWIND! (Ta-da!)

Setting up the scheduler (Tailwind’s Publisher feature)

What you did in Board Booster: Selected the boards you wanted to pin to and set up dates, times, and number of pins for each board. Board Booster created secret boards which you then curated your pins onto and BB took care of releasing them to your publicly visible boards according to the schedule you set up.

What you need to do in Tailwind: Identify how many times you want to pin each day to your various boards, TOTAL. Create a smart schedule in the publisher under “your schedule”. Tell tailwind how many times per day you want to post. I recommend 20-30.  It will generate a schedule for each day of the week with recommended time slots that you can edit, delete, or add to.

NOTE: each day will probably NOT have the exact number of pin times you requested. For instance if you chose to pin 20 times per day, some days may have more than 20 and some days may have less than 20, but over the course of a week, the pinning AVERAGE will be 20/day.

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Screenshot of the “Your Schedule” screen after generating a new smart schedule in Tailwind. Don’t forget to set your timezone!

Adding Pins to Publisher

What you did in Board Booster: browsed Pinterest and pin directly to secret feeder boards.

What you need to to in Tailwind: source pins  within Tailwind itself, as well as within Pinterest using the Tailwind extension. I’ll cover some of the unique ways to source pins from within Tailwind in a bit. For now, let’s focus on what happens when we source a pin from within Pinterest.

Whenever you want to add a pin to add to the publisher from within Pinterest, you’ll want to click the tailwind icon that appears when you hover over the pin. Then choose which board you want to pin to. From there the easiest thing to do is to simply add to queue – since you’ve got this lovely smart schedule all set up. Don’t worry about it if you’re adding a bunch of pins to the same board in a row. Once you are done adding all your pins, you can simply visit the “Scheduled Pins” section under the Publisher feature and shuffle the queue a few times to mix them up. However, you CAN also assign specific dates/times to each pin at the time of pinning. To do this, just click the little clock in the corner of the pin preview that pops up after clicking the tailwind icon.

TWPublisher2

Add a board, or several, and click add to queue! Make sure there is a source URL, Tailwind won’t allow you to schedule any pins without a source URL.

Within the “scheduled pins” screen itself, you can drag pins around to different time slots, lock pins in place so they don’t get shuffled, and send scheduled pins back to drafts for editing. Just click and drag the thumbnails or click the timestamp on the larger pin views to the left to edit.

TWPublisher3

Just click to edit any part of a pin – time, target board, description, or url. PLUS, send pin to twitter or facebook page right from the interface! The lock symbol means this pin won’t move when the queue is shuffled.

Sourcing Pins (from within Tailwind):

Maybe you used the Pin Sourcing feature on Board Booster to automatically find pins for you based on a board, or a keyword search term, etc. Tailwind doesn’t have that feature, but it does have a few different ways to help you find quality, relevant, content to reshare to your own boards and fill up your scheduler.

One such way to find related content is to hop over to the “published pins” screen, under the Publisher feature. There you’ll see pins you’ve added recently. You can filter these by board, by category, and by url source. Then you can look at the pins that performed the best and click “find similar content”. From the pop-up screen, you can refresh the suggestions over and over if you’d like.

You can also repeat this same process from the “pin inspector” screen under “insights”.

TWPublisher4

Previously published pins, filtered by board title, and sorted by repin count. You can reschedule the pin, add to tribes, and/or find similar content from this screen.

TWPublisher5

What you see if you click find similar content. Refresh as needed. Add to schedule as you would any other pin.

Another way to find relevant pin content is to head over to the “Insights” tab and click “Board Insights”. This screen will show you a report of your individual boards’ performances including the number of pins on the board, number of people following the board, number of repins from the board, a virality score (tailwind specific metric), and engagement score (tailwind specific metric).

I like to deselect group and secret boards so it only shows the boards you have publicly visible and that you curated yourself. From there, you simply click the find similar content button for the board of your choice, and add pins to the queue as usual.

TWPublisher6

I focus on adding pins to boards that are performing the best, to keep them active and draw in traffic.

The last way to source pins from within Tailwind is via the Tribes feature. You’ll have to look for tribes that fit your niche well and then you simply browse the pins that have been added to that tribe and send them to your queue as usual!

TWPublisher7

On the PLUS plan, you’re limited to 5 tribes (unless you were an early adopter). However, you can purchase unlimited tribe access for an additional fee.

Contributing to Tribes

That brings me to the issue of tribes on Tailwind vs. Tribes on Board Booster. They are totally different, and not automated on Tailwind, so you need to be sure to follow each tribes rules to a T, or you’ll be removed from the tribe.

What you did on Board Booster: With Board Booster tribes, you simply added your pins into the tribe and selected which board you wanted tribe repins to go to. Then Board Booster automated the repinning, making sure everyone’s content had an equal chance to be repinned.

The great thing about that system was that everyone had a chance to get repins. The bad thing about that system is you often ended up with not very well niched tribes, your pins got repinned to irrelevant boards, etc. Also, these pins did not go into your secret feeder boards/scheduler, so using Board Booser tribes could crazy increase how many pins you were pinning each day – which could come across as spammy behavior.

What you need to do on Tailwind: Join niche-relevant tribes and contribute your best pins. Reshare other’s pins by adding to your scheduler queue.

Since each tribe member is responsible for adding pins from the tribe to their queue, and it’s not automated, you get to pick and choose which pins to share. And unlike Board Booster where all tribe pins were forced to go to the same board(s), regardless of relevancy, you can pick a different target board for each pin you decide to use.

The bad thing about Tailwind’s system is your pin may not get picked at all. There’s no guarantee tribe members will choose to repin your content. HOWEVER, if you are creating quality pins and joining niched, relevant, tribes, your chances of getting reshared are good. If you find your pins aren’t getting reshared at all after a period of time (let’s say a month) then you need to either up your pin design game or find a different tribe to join.

You can also create your own tribes, invite members to tribes you belong to, and see how well your pins are performing within each tribe you belong to.

NOTE: Unless you pay for the tribe boost (upgrade), on the PLUS plan you’ll be limited to 5 tribes and 30 pin contributions (total across all tribes) per month. 

Pinning your own original content

What you did on Board Booster: Set up a “scheduled campaign” to enable you to pin your original content pins once to multiple related boards or group boards, based on an interval schedule you set.

What you need to do on Tailwind: Create Board Lists and utilize Intervals.

First, go into the Publisher tab and click on Board Lists. Create groupings of boards you will commonly want to pin the same pin to. For instance, your newest blog post would normally get pinned to x, y, and z personal board plus your 5 blogger group boards. Put all of these boards into a board list and give the list a title that will help you remember when to use it (i.e. new blog post pins).

TIP: Put the MOST relevant board as the first board in the list – I.E your dedicated blog or biz board – or manually pin to the most relevant board and then schedule out the rest. This is important because repins will retain all the SEO information of the first board the pin is pinned to.

Then, whenever you are ready to schedule out your original content, go into the “scheduled pins” section of the publisher and click create new pin. Upload your pin image files from your computer, instagram, or a browser extension button. The uploaded images will go into the drafts section where you can edit urls, descriptions, and choose which boards they should be pinned to.  Choose the board list (marked with a yellow star) you want to use and add any other individual boards that may be relevant to that particular pin.

Then DO NOT click add to queue!!! This is important. In order to add these pins to the scheduler in a LOCKED position, so they won’t get shuffled up and are guaranteed to go out on the right day at a specific time, and be spread over a period of time rather then all at once, you want to use INTERVALS.

You will not see this option until you have selected multiple boards (or a board list), so make sure you have the target boards designated first.

Then look at the bottom of the pin and next to “add to queue” you’ll see “use interval”. Click that. Then click “optimized”. This will put the pin in your scheduler in a LOCKED time spot that is OUTSIDE of your designated time slots already (so your original content won’t take up a time slot, or be at risk of getting shuffled around, and you can be sure you’re keeping a good ratio of your content to other pinner’s content).

You’ll need to select what day and time you want the interval pinning to begin, and how long tailwind should wait before releasing the pin to the next board. I recommend 1 day intervals, unless you have a LOT of boards that pin is going to (like, more than 7). In that case I do some math so that all my boards will get pinned to within a week’s time. So depending on how many boards are getting the pin, your interval might be 8, 10, or 12 hours (for instance).

TIP: I upload about 3-7 original pins per week in order to constantly have fresh content going out

Alright, I think that pretty much covers everything – except looping (and random campaigns from Board Booster, which was essentially another looping feature). Tailwind has Smart Loop in beta right now and I haven’t personally experimented with it, so that will have to be a blog post for another day. Update 8/30/18: I just got invited to the private beta and webinar in September! I’m super excited to get all the best practice deets! I’ll be sure to post and share tips with you!

Hope this guide has helped your transition anxiety and provided some valuable insight into how to use Tailwind (there’s that sneaky affiliate link again – but seriously you should try it!) to effectively manage your pinning strategy! If you have any questions, leave a comment or tag me in our Pinterest Mastermind Community on Facebook!

xoxo

Ready to get started with Tailwind? Click below for your FREE TRIAL!
(affiliate link)

Tailwind Visual Marketing Suite


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Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

Pinterest Analytics Explained: your “website” stats

Pinterest Analytics Explained: Understanding what the Website stats tell you about your pin performance.

This is part 4 of the Pinterest Analytics Explained series.

In Part 1 of our series, Pinterest Analytics Explained, we looked at some definitions for various stat parameters that Pinterest includes in their analytics section. These definitions are important to keep in mind as we go through the remainder of the series, so if you need a refresher click the link to Part 1 above.

In Part 2, we looked at the data you find under the “profile” section of your analytics dashboard.

In Part 3, we discussed the (limited) purpose and use of the “people you reach” section.

Today we are moving on to discuss the “website” section of Pinterest Analytics.

It’s important to note you will be able to see this data set ONLY if you have verified your website with Pinterest. 

For those of you that care most about driving traffic from Pinterest to your stand alone website, this is the MOST important section of your analytics dashboard.

This section specifically shows you the performance of pins that source back to your verified website.

Pinterest doesn’t make clear whether these values go on to include impressions, saves, or clicks made on repins of your original pins. While repins still link to your website, I have seen copies of pins recieve hundreds of repins from that copy and those values don’t seem to be reflected in the website analytics dashboard.

So this is a bit of a grey area. I’m inclined to say that the values you see under the website section do NOT include impressions, saves, or clicks made on any copies (repins) of your pin – but rather reflect only DIRECT impressions, saves, and clicks made on the original pin(s) on your account.

Regardless, this section of stats aims to show you how your original content (from your Pinterest verified website) is performing.

If you need a more clear, and complete, view of how your content is performing on Pinterest, then looking on your website’s at the referral traffic stats or using Google Analytics to track pin traffic to your website is what I’d recommend doing.

Unfortunately, I’m not a Google Anlaytics expert. I am just beginning to learn more about how to use it for more extensive Pinterest tracking myself – so perhaps in the near-ish future I’ll have some advice for you on this. But for now, you’ll need to do your own research on using Google Analytics, if you want more extensive data than what Pinterest Analytics can show you.

Other than the fact that the website analytics section shows you information that encompasses ONLY pins from your website, as opposed to all pins you add to your boards from other sources, the data itself reads much like the data from the “profile” section of the dashboard.

(If you’re unsure what an impression, save, or click entails, read Part 1 of this series.)

Troubleshooting your website stats:

It IS possible to experience a drop in overall “profile” stats and either stay the same or experience an increase in “website” stats.

What this could indicate is that overall you are getting fewer views or reaching fewer people, but that the percentage of your original content being seen, out of all the content you share from around Pinterest, is greater.

Ideally we want BOTH “profile” and “website” stats to trend upwards. BUT as long as the “website” stats aren’t suffering, we don’t need to get too worked up over a drop in the “profile” stats.

If your “website” stats overall are dropping, check these 3 things:

  1. Have you pinned new content from your website lately? I recommend a minimum of 2 pins per week that link back to your website. More if you’re able.
  2. Have you been pinning and re-pinning your site content to group boards daily?
  3. Are your pins visually attractive and does the text (copy writing) grab viewers attention?

If you’re getting lots of saves but not a lot of clicks:

  1. Check your pin’s visual appeal.
  2. Check your pin URL’s to make sure they aren’t broken. (Board Booster has a great feature that makes this easy)
  3. Be patient. Yes we all want people to click through to our site, but saves are where it starts. Saves are good because they get your content out in front of more and more people each time. The more people seeing your pin, the more opportunity you have to get those click throughs.

If you’re getting lots of impressions but no saves or clicks:

  1. Check your pin’s visual appeal and check for working URLs
  2. Check which group boards you are pinning to. Does anyone repin from the group board (How are other pins on the board performing?) You may not be sharing your content on boards that are very active or very relevant to your brand/biz/blog. Look for quality group boards.
  3. Check your consistency and be realistic about how long you’ve been pinning consistent content. Pins get better over time. One week isn’t long enough to gain traction on a pin. One month isn’t long enough to judge overall performance. Give it time and stay consistent.

If you aren’t getting any impressions, saves, or clicks:

It’s hard to nail this down to one specific issue, but you probably have some areas of your Pinterest set up that could use some help. Check out the resource library for video tutorials and webinars on best Pinterest practices.

Maybe you just need help pinning consistently? Check out Board Booster BOSS to learn how to streamline and automate your pinning strategy to help keep you consistent without taking up hours of your time each week.

At the very least, read the blog! There’s a TON of helpful material right here! (Subscribe to get new posts sent to your inbox.)

If you’ve got a question about your stats, visit me in the Mastermind Community on Facebook and let’s talk about it!

Until next time,

xoxo

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Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

Pinterest Analytics Explained: Analytics Terminology

Pinterest Analytics Part 1: Analytics Terminology

Pinterest Analytics, available to Pinterest for Business users only, are a MUST for anyone using Pinterest to market or promote their own content (products, services, blog posts, etc.). But many users, especially those newer to Pinterest Marketing, are often confused by the terms and numbers. What do “impressions” mean? What numbers are important for me? What does it mean when the numbers drop?

This blog series aims to answer some of the more common questions about analytics. I’ll also identify and explain some of the stat trends you might see and what that means for your overall pinning strategy (i.e. what adjustments you may need to make).

To start, let’s do a quick tour of the analytics dashboard and discuss some terminology.

If you hover over the “analytics” menu button, you’ll see that you have 3 or 4 options in a drop-down box. Everyone should see “overview” “profile” and “people you reach”. If you’ve verified your website, then you should also see a “website” option.

If you do not see a “website” option, you need to go verify your website with Pinterest in order to see these stats. This is SUPER important if you are using Pinterest to market/promote your own content! If you’ve tried to verify your website unsuccessfully, and it’s been more than 24 hrs since you tried, you’ll want to put a ticket in with the Help Desk. They can help verify your site manually.

We’ll get into what each of these sections show us later in the series. For now, let’s iron out what each type of stat is:

  • An impression is the same as a view. That means a pin from your account showed up on someone’s screen as a result of the smart feed, a search query, etc.
  • A viewer is a single Pinterest user/account and is not the same as an impression. Several impressions may be attributed to a single viewer.
  • Pinterest shows a stat called “average engaged”. This represents the number of viewers taking an action and is different from an engagement. An engagement is an action taken on a pin by a viewer (save, click, etc.), it documents the number of actions taken. Average engaged documents the number of people taking action.
  • A save is the same as a repin. That means someone added your pin to a board. Where this gets tricky is that once a pin from person A is added to person B’s board, saves from person’s B’s board count toward THEIR analytics, not yours. So the save stats you see here are direct repins from a pin that links to YOUR Pinterest account (regardless of whether the content of the pin belongs to you).
    • Pinterest counts any pin you add to any board as YOUR pin. This includes:
      • all of your uploaded pin images
      • all of your saved pin images from anywhere on the web
      • all of your saved pins from anywhere on Pinterest
      • So, if YOU clicked “save”, then that pin is yours – the CONTENT may not be yours, but the pin is.
I know that’s super confusing! We’ll dig deeper into this and I’ll show you examples as we go through the series.
  • A click registers when someone is redirected from a pin on Pinterest to the website link associated with that pin. Again, this doesn’t mean they visited YOUR website, but this click is counted under your stats because the pin is saved from your Pinterest account.

Okay, we’re going to stop here and I’ll give you all until next week to wrap your heads around this info!

If you’re confused about any of the above terms, join me in my Pinterest Mastermind Community and let’s talk about it!

Check out the Resource Library for the case study video & more Pinterest Tips  HERE!

Until then,

Happy Pinning!-2

 

Pinterest Analytics Tracker

Pinterest Analytics Tracker

Let’s just say today is Christmas and I’m Santa because you’re going to love your gift today! As you know I’m a Pinterest Strategist. That’s just a fancy way of saying I work with people & business every day to help them leverage Pinterest as the powerful marketing platform it is. It’s one of the most incredible things I’ve ever done!

Part of what I offer my clients is weekly stats. I track their analytics and send them weekly reports so they can see just how amazing Pinterest is when you use it correctly!

This week I’m celebrating some tremendous success for my clients and my way of sharing the confetti is to offer you one of my most prized tools!

I’m making available to you the exact Pinterest Analytics Tracker I use for all of my client’s stats and growth trends.

If you are looking for a thorough way to keep up with how well Pinterest is working for you then follow the link and download it today!

Just to share the love I’ve made a demo video to make it easier to use!

Don’t forget to sign up for the FREE Resource Library HERE

Have Pinterest Questions? Join my private Facebook Group- Pinterest Mastermind Community- HERE

Happy Pinning!-2