8 Critical Keyword Placements for Pinterest SEO

Did you know that Pinterest works VERY differently than any other social media platform? That’s because it’s not even really social media! It’s a SEARCH ENGINE!

Like all search engines (Google, Bing, etc.) Pinterest relies on keywords and keyword phrases to match users with what they are looking for.

Easy enough when you are a casual Pinterest user, just type what you want in the search bar and go! But what about when you are using Pinterest as a business or blogger and YOU are the one putting the content up? How does SEO work for you to get the right eyes on your content?⁣

Well, there are 8 CRITICAL PLACES you should be strategically using keywords related to your niche and content. ⁣

These are: ⁣
1) Board Titles
2) Pin Titles
3) Board Descriptions
4) Pin Descriptions
5) Hashtags
6) Sub-board Titles
7) Profile Name
8) Profile Bio

Let’s take a look at each one in depth.

1. Board Titles

When you want to create a new collection of pins (AKA board), your board titles tell Pinterest a LOT about what kind of content they should expect to find on that board. ⁣

When a user searches for something, let’s say Valentine’s Day Treats, the user can choose to filter the search results by BOARD TITLE – making the keywords you use in your board title EXTRA important and powerful!⁣

When you go to create a new board, title it with your audience and ideal viewer in mind. What content are you planning to put on this board? What term is your audience likely to search for to find this type of content?⁣

There are likely several similar terms you could use: Valentine’s Day Desserts, Valentine’s Day Sweets, Valentine’s Day Party Snacks, etc.⁣

You can do a little research and look these terms up in the Pinterest search bar. See what kind of content shows up and if your planned content fits well with those results.⁣

Also, you can check out trends.pinterest.com to compare 2-4 similar terms and see which one might be more popular!⁣

Whatever you do, DON’T use Board titles like V-Day Goodies or I love Baking or Nom Nom Cookies!⁣

LONG STORY SHORT: You want your board titles to be a 2-5 word search term (I prefer 3 or 4) that users are likely to search for!

2. Pin Titles

Pin Titles are a relatively new feature still. ⁣

Often when you create a pin from a URL (or input a URL manually), The Pin Title will auto-fill. ⁣

But you do not HAVE to use the words that auto-fill based on the metadata. ⁣

Regardless of whether you use the auto-fill or manually input a pin title, you should use a keyword phrase that is representative of the rephrase content topic. This phrase can be “sentence like” as in “13 Ways to Use Coconut Oil”, or you can start the pin title with a shorter keyword phrase like “Wardrobe Essentials” and then use your blog of Business name and/or other “subtitle” keywords. ⁣

I.E. Wardrobe Essentials: Lightweight Sweaters – Next Level Wardrobe (we do this when we’re pinning IG content for @nextlevelwardrobe) ;)⁣

Whatever you do, remember to use keywords people are likely to search for! ⁣

Pro Tip: Use “Title Case”!!! ⁣

3. Board Descriptions

I bet you have boards on Pinterest that don’t have a board description. ⁣

It’s okay, a lot of people miss putting descriptions up for their boards. BUT it’s a missed SEO opportunity!⁣

Board descriptions help further define your board’s content. And they help Pinterest associate additional keyword phrases with your boards. ⁣

Remember how I said there are likely several similar search friendly phrases you could use to title your board? ⁣We picked the most popular or the one that people would most likely search for, to use as the Board Title, but we don’t have to “throw away” those other search terms!⁣

Put them in your Board Description!⁣

You can either write your descriptions in sentence structure (which is more aesthetically pleasing), or you can just list out the additional keyword phrases – or you can do both and write a short sentence followed by a list of keywords. ⁣

Regardless, don’t leave this spot blank. Even just 3-5 keyword phrases is better than nothing!⁣

4. Pin Descriptions

Pin descriptions aren’t as prominent as they used to be. Pinterest keeps changing how descriptions are viewed. ⁣

As of now, descriptions are hidden under a “more information about this pin” button, which is only visible when you click the pin for a closeup.⁣

Does that mean pin descriptions aren’t important?⁣

No! ⁣

Now, I have a gut feeling that descriptions MAY go away completely. I am envisioning a world where you use keyword TAGS on pins rather than typing freeform descriptions. ⁣

I could be WAY off base, this is just speculation, but given how descriptions have been continually buried, it’s not out of the realm of possibility.⁣


At least for now, pin descriptions are still important and you should definitely be writing 2-3 sentences with keywords in them for each pin you create OF YOUR OWN CONTENT. ⁣


Don’t waste time writing or re-writing pin descriptions on OTHER people’s pins! If you run into a pin that has no description or has a poor quality description, just skip pinning that particular pin (unless you REALLY LOVE the pin and just NEED it on your board).⁣

If I end up being right about the whole tag thing, you can consider me a psychic ;)⁣

5. Hashtags

Now… hashtags on Pinterest are a constant back and forth… first they didn’t want you to use them, then they did, and now sometimes they work and sometimes they don’t… ⁣

As wonky and wishy-washy as Pinterest has been on the use of hashtags, until they definitely say hashtags are no more, I still advise you to use 3-5 hashtags on each pin.⁣

Here’s the thing about hashtags on Pinterest though:⁣

  • Hashtags are clickable ONLY on pins. Not in board descriptions, not in bios, JUST in pin descriptions.⁣
  • A hashtag search, or clicking on a hashtag, brings up a COMPLETELY different feed/results than typing in the same exact keyword phrase, sans hashtag would. The hashtag feed is CHRONOLOGICAL. The regular search results feed is not.⁣
  • Hashtags on Pinterest SHOULD be keyword phrases just like any other search term, but without spaces and with the # in front. like #pinteresttips ⁣
  • You should not “design” or use “cutesy” hashtags on Pitnerest. #ilovepinterest would be a no go.⁣
  • ALWAYS prioritize a good description with target keyword phrases over hashtags. I recommend using 2-4 hashtags as long as you have enough character space to do so.
  • Hashtags are only needed on NEW pins, at the time that you first add that pin. Going back to edit old pins to add hashtags is useless.⁣

Hashtags ARE a critical place to includes SEO, but they are not AS critical as the first 4 locations we’ve already covered. ⁣

IF in the future, Pinterest does away with the hashtag feature again, then by all means do not use them. Until then, you’ve been advised. 😉⁣

6. Sub-Board Titles

How many of you use sub-boards on Pinterest?⁣

They aren’t always necessary, but I do recommend using them in certain situations:⁣

A) when your main blog or biz board need category sections. ⁣

For instance, if you’re a lifestyle blogger you might have sub boards on your main blog board for “food” “family” “travel” etc. to reflect what topics you write about and be able to organize that board accordingly⁣

Or you might be a jewelry seller, so on your main products board you might have sections for “bracelets”, “necklaces”, and “rings”.⁣

Of course you can ALWAYS have separate boards for these too, sub boards just help add some organization and bring attention to certain sub-topics of a main topic, that viewers may not easily be able to see or find when looking at the board as a whole.⁣

B) for very large boards with hundreds of pins⁣

Similar concept… but say you have a very large wedding inspiration board, you could have sub boards for “wedding decor”, “wedding cakes”, “wedding signs”, etc. ⁣

Again, you could also make separate boards for these.⁣

So how does SEO fit with sub-boards? Well, just like main boards you should give sub-boards a title that is a search-friendly, 2-5 word phrase.

While sub-boards don’t show up in filtered search results (you can’t filter your search results by sub-board title, but you can filter them by board title), the title of your sub-boards is still a spot the Pinterest algorithm looks to determine what your main board is all about. ⁣

Sub-board titles are obviously only important if you actually USE sub-boards. You do NOT need to go making all these sub-boards JUST for the sake of SEO.⁣

7. Your Profile Name

This might surprise you but the profile name you use on Pinterest actually matters!

This is a critical optimization place that people often miss!

Because you can filter search results by “pinner”, your profile name carries SEO weight!

For instance, if someone where to search for “life coach” in the Pinterest search bar, then click the filter button to filter by pinner, they could then find all the users that have “life coach” in their profile name!

That means:

  • If you do business under YOUR OWN NAME, you should definitely add a keyword phrase after your name that tells people what you do. I.e Life Coach, or Social Media Manager or Virtual Assistant.
  • If you do business under a BUSINESS or BRAND name, you should use THAT as your profile name, NOT your own first name. And you could/should still add a keyword phrase after if you have enough character space.

8. Your Bio

Your profile bio is yet another commonly missed place on Pinterest that you should be using keyword phrases.

While this area isn’t searchable, like your profile name is, it still helps to tell Pinterest what your account focuses on.

Since, you know, as a business owner and/or blogger, you SHOULD be pinning about things related to your niche and audience. ( I.E If you’re pinning recipes and you’re not a food blogger, nutritionist, or health coach, STOP IT! )

Check your bio and make sure you’ve included at least ONE long tail keyword phrase (that’s a 3 or 4 word phrase that relates to your niche or “what it is that you do”).

Now that you know where the key locations are for you oh-so-important keywords and keyword phrases – go do a quick audit of your Pinterest account and see if you need to do some work in the SEO department. 😉

Need more help or clarification? Or maybe just another set of eyes on your account to spot where you may have improvement needs?

Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

What Can Pinterest Do For You? My Clients’ Real Results (August Analytics Reports)

What can Pinterest do for your biz or blog? Check out my client's real results! (August 2018 Reports).

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links, which means I may receive a small commission, at no cost to you, if you make a purchase through a link, which I’ve indicated as affiliate links in parentheses, like this: (affiliate link).  


I’m going to be real transparent with you all right now and do something I’ve never done before.

I’m going to publicly show you a few of my clients’ Pinterest stats (anonymously, of course). These are real people and real accounts. The growth is real, as are the declines.

My purpose in showing you all this is so that you can see what Pinterest is capable of. You can see the growth client’s get when we start putting time and effort into their profiles and original content. You can see the ups and downs over time. You get to see REAL results.

I’m a big fan of being REAL with you all. I’m never going to promise you 30 day explosive results or overnight success. Ask anyone who has ever worked with me and they’ll tell you that I always recommend:

-a consistent daily pinning strategy
-a foundation of niche relevant boards
SEO SEO SEO in all the places
new boards monthly
-new original content WEEKLY
-a serious time and effort investment of at least 3-6 months. (3 months to see growth potential, 6 months MINIMUM to see results)

You can’t half-a** this. If you want serious results, you have to put in serious work. My motto is “Quality in enough Quantity, Consistently over Time”.

If you AREN’T seeing ANY growth, ANY results, and you are ready to GIVE UP on Pinterest – or if results/growth is just slow as molasses –  then it’s likely you have an issue with one or more of the following:

Quality: How’s your board topics, pin content, original content, pin visuals, pin captions, SEO, etc.?
Quantity: How many pins you are pinning of other’s and of your own content? How many boards do you have? etc.
Consistency: How often are you pinning? Is it sporadic? Is it spread out throughout the day or all at once? etc.
Time: Have you been trying your current strategy for two weeks? Two months? or Two years? When was the last time you changed up your strategy? When did you start really putting time and effort into Pinterest?

But I digress…

My point is, it’s one of my core values to be real with the information I give my clients and readers. So, to that end, check out these clients’ account stats!


Client A

Client A came to me with a Pinterest that had been run by an entity in India. (No offense to residents/natives of India, that’s just where her management company was based). The entity had very little understanding of how Pinterest worked and NOTHING was optimized. Her pins were very low quality, not optimized for Pinterest sizing, some images were not used legally, etc. She had been using them for a year! She needed a complete rehaul of her account, with niched boards, SEO, and better pin visuals/descriptions. We implemented that in July and in August focused on pushing out her original content and pinning daily. Here are her results:

Charts

Profile Graphs

Website Graphs


Client B

Client B came to me with a similar situation. She needed a complete rehaul as well. We did a POWER UP and then moved her into Ongoing Management in month two. We’ve created branded pins for her and have been using Tailwind (affiliate link) to pin daily, keep an eye on her top performing boards, and pushing her original content to tribes. As a basically brand new account, growth will be slow, but look at how her profile views jumped from essentially nothing to over 176K from May to August! She’s also starting to accumulate clicks to her website – low numbers, but you have to start somewhere. Pinterest has a snowball effect…

Charts

Profile Graphs

Website Graphs


Client C

Client C came to me with a beautiful Pinterest account that was already performing well, but not getting her many clicks back to her website. She needed a little cleanup as far as SEO goes, and also needed a little board “restructuring” to bring in some more niche topics and to consolidate boards with duplicate content. We also began designing pins for her with a consistent branded look. She began to see an increase in clicks to her site and we’ve since been experimenting with promoted pins to get her even MORE traffic! Take a look…

Charts

Profile Graphs

Website Graphs

Now, you might notice in some of her graphs that things look a little wonky around the end of June – this is where we switched from using Board Booster to using Tailwind and things had to recalibrate a bit.


I’ve got loads more examples, but you should be able to see from the above that no matter where you are starting in your Pinterest journey there is *usually* room for improvement and growth! You can also check out this link to see typical results you can expect when using Tailwind (affiliate link)– which is the scheduling platform we recommend (and use for our own clients; we’ve used other platforms and Tailwind simply blows them all out of the water!)

So, how can Pinterest help you? Well, it can get you:

  • more organic brand awareness/exposure
  • more traffic to your website/blog
  • more authority in your chosen niche
  • more sales/readers/followers/raving fans

and if you need help, I’m here for you!

  • Got a quick question? Comment below or pop over to our FB Group.
  • Need an account rehaul/clean up or some optimizing done? Check out our Power Ups! (I’ve literally built nearly 100 Pinterest accounts from scratch ya’ll)
  • Need someone to take the stress away and just magically make it all better? Check out our Management options!

And if you just need a shoulder to cry on, a hot latte, and a hug – because business is HARD sometimes – well, I can empathize with you, Google nearby support groups,. and commiserate with you via Zoom if you’d like 😉

Til next time,

xoxo


Tailwind Visual Marketing Suite

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Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

Why Group Boards Are NOT the Best Strategy to Get Your Content Seen

Why Group Boards are NOT the best strategy to get your content seen on Pinterest

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links, which means I may receive a small commission, at no cost to you, if you make a purchase through a link, which I’ve indicated as affiliate links in parentheses, like this: (affiliate link).  


Group Boards have been around for a long time, and up until this July they were an integral part of any content creator’s Pinterest strategy.

They are still around, but Pinterest has wised up to the fact that most content creators have been using group boards as a way to disseminate their content to the masses. And they’ve basically said “no more”.

Group boards, per Pinterest, were never meant to be a way to push content to viewers. Pinterest intended group boards to be a feature for pinners, who were collaborating on a project or event, to share pins relevant to that project/event with each other.

In order to get back to that original vision, and to discourage the growth of massive group boards with thousands of pins, Pinterest has DEPRIORITIZED content from group boards.

What does that mean?

Before the algorithm update of 2018, pins that were added to group boards had just as much of a chance of turning up (ranking highly) in search results and in the Smart Feed.

With the de-emphasis of group boards, Pinterest is actively suppressing pins that come from group boards in search results/feeds. Pins that are saved to self-curated, publicly visible boards, are thus “prioritized” over pins that come from group boards.

Does this mean we should leave all of our group boards?

Eventually, this might mean that group boards no longer have a place in your Pinterest strategy. HOWEVER, if you belong to very active, niched, groups where the collaborators are routinely visiting that board and repinning content from that board, I wouldn’t leave it just yet.

Because although the pins to add to that board may not be discovered in searches/feeds, they are still findable by group board members when they visit the board, and they may repin your content.

So, bottom line, what’s the recommendation? What should we do instead?

Only your individual Pinterest/Tailwind stats and website traffic can really tell you the right answer here. Just keep in mind that you can’t solely rely on group boards for your exposure now.

But you should definitely be keeping an eye on your pins and how they are performing on your group boards. If your pins are still getting repinned from those boards, if the boards themselves seem high quality, and if leaving the board(s) would cause a significant decrease in your reach/traffic – then I’d suggest that you keep the group board and keep contributing to it, until it’s no longer performing well.

Meanwhile, ALSO invest time into Tailwind Tribes (affiliate link). Find tribes that are active. Add some pins to the tribe and see how they perform. Over time, you may wish to replace pinning to group boards with tribe contributions completely.

ADDITIONALLY, be sure you are focusing on:

  • curating high quality boards of your own
  • using good SEO in all the key places
  • releasing fresh pin content on a consistent basis

xoxo


blogpic icon

Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

 
Tailwind Visual Marketing Suite

The Ultimate Guide To Making The Switch From Board Booster To Tailwind

Switching from Board Booster to Tailwind: Best Practices

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links, which means I may receive a small commission, at no cost to you, if you make a purchase through a link, which I’ve indicated as affiliate links in parentheses, like this: (affiliate link).  


The Pinterest Marketing world was shaken up quite a bit in late June of this year when Board Booster shut down amid talks with Pinterest regarding partner status. Unfortunately for all of us that loved Board Booster for it’s unique features, we’ve been left to adjust our pinning strategy to either manual pinning only or to one of the official Pinterest pin-scheduler partners (say THAT five times fast!). That leaves Hootsuite, Buffer, and Tailwind (affiliate link – Yes, I’m an affiliate now ya’ll – that’s how much I’m a believer!) as our current options.

Of these three, Tailwind is by far the most robust and will be the easiest transition for previous Board Booster users. You can accomplish many of the same things with Tailwind as you did with Board Booster, just the mechanics of it are a bit different. Honestly, what took me the most time to get used to was the user interface of Tailwind. Once you learn where everything is and how it works and/or replaces previous Board Booster features (may they rest in peace), using Tailwind to manage your pinning strategy will be just as easy as it was before.

I’ve even discovered a few new tricks with Tailwind that make sourcing pins for your scheduler way easier than it ever was in Board Booster.

The biggest plus for making the switch though? Tailwind as an official partner (affiliate link) doesn’t violate the TOS of Pinterest and so there is no risk of your account or pins being penalized for being published through this program. And with Pinterest putting extra focus on new, fresh, pins (versus repins), Tailwind provides some security there too – whenever you pin the same pin to multiple boards via Tailwind, each instance of that pin is a “fresh” pin – not a copy (repin) of the original. Mischief managed! (Harry Potter fans unite!)

Okay, so ALL that said, HOW do you take that lovely streamlined easy peasy pinterest strategy you had all figured out in Board Booster and transfer it over to Tailwind without giving yourself a grade A migraine in the process?

Introducing…. THE BLUE FAIRY STUDIOS ULTIMATE GUIDE TO MAKING THE SWITCH FROM BOARD BOOSTER TO TAILWIND! (Ta-da!)

Setting up the scheduler (Tailwind’s Publisher feature)

What you did in Board Booster: Selected the boards you wanted to pin to and set up dates, times, and number of pins for each board. Board Booster created secret boards which you then curated your pins onto and BB took care of releasing them to your publicly visible boards according to the schedule you set up.

What you need to do in Tailwind: Identify how many times you want to pin each day to your various boards, TOTAL. Create a smart schedule in the publisher under “your schedule”. Tell tailwind how many times per day you want to post. I recommend 20-30.  It will generate a schedule for each day of the week with recommended time slots that you can edit, delete, or add to.

NOTE: each day will probably NOT have the exact number of pin times you requested. For instance if you chose to pin 20 times per day, some days may have more than 20 and some days may have less than 20, but over the course of a week, the pinning AVERAGE will be 20/day.

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Screenshot of the “Your Schedule” screen after generating a new smart schedule in Tailwind. Don’t forget to set your timezone!

Adding Pins to Publisher

What you did in Board Booster: browsed Pinterest and pin directly to secret feeder boards.

What you need to to in Tailwind: source pins  within Tailwind itself, as well as within Pinterest using the Tailwind extension. I’ll cover some of the unique ways to source pins from within Tailwind in a bit. For now, let’s focus on what happens when we source a pin from within Pinterest.

Whenever you want to add a pin to add to the publisher from within Pinterest, you’ll want to click the tailwind icon that appears when you hover over the pin. Then choose which board you want to pin to. From there the easiest thing to do is to simply add to queue – since you’ve got this lovely smart schedule all set up. Don’t worry about it if you’re adding a bunch of pins to the same board in a row. Once you are done adding all your pins, you can simply visit the “Scheduled Pins” section under the Publisher feature and shuffle the queue a few times to mix them up. However, you CAN also assign specific dates/times to each pin at the time of pinning. To do this, just click the little clock in the corner of the pin preview that pops up after clicking the tailwind icon.

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Add a board, or several, and click add to queue! Make sure there is a source URL, Tailwind won’t allow you to schedule any pins without a source URL.

Within the “scheduled pins” screen itself, you can drag pins around to different time slots, lock pins in place so they don’t get shuffled, and send scheduled pins back to drafts for editing. Just click and drag the thumbnails or click the timestamp on the larger pin views to the left to edit.

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Just click to edit any part of a pin – time, target board, description, or url. PLUS, send pin to twitter or facebook page right from the interface! The lock symbol means this pin won’t move when the queue is shuffled.

Sourcing Pins (from within Tailwind):

Maybe you used the Pin Sourcing feature on Board Booster to automatically find pins for you based on a board, or a keyword search term, etc. Tailwind doesn’t have that feature, but it does have a few different ways to help you find quality, relevant, content to reshare to your own boards and fill up your scheduler.

One such way to find related content is to hop over to the “published pins” screen, under the Publisher feature. There you’ll see pins you’ve added recently. You can filter these by board, by category, and by url source. Then you can look at the pins that performed the best and click “find similar content”. From the pop-up screen, you can refresh the suggestions over and over if you’d like.

You can also repeat this same process from the “pin inspector” screen under “insights”.

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Previously published pins, filtered by board title, and sorted by repin count. You can reschedule the pin, add to tribes, and/or find similar content from this screen.

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What you see if you click find similar content. Refresh as needed. Add to schedule as you would any other pin.

Another way to find relevant pin content is to head over to the “Insights” tab and click “Board Insights”. This screen will show you a report of your individual boards’ performances including the number of pins on the board, number of people following the board, number of repins from the board, a virality score (tailwind specific metric), and engagement score (tailwind specific metric).

I like to deselect group and secret boards so it only shows the boards you have publicly visible and that you curated yourself. From there, you simply click the find similar content button for the board of your choice, and add pins to the queue as usual.

TWPublisher6

I focus on adding pins to boards that are performing the best, to keep them active and draw in traffic.

The last way to source pins from within Tailwind is via the Tribes feature. You’ll have to look for tribes that fit your niche well and then you simply browse the pins that have been added to that tribe and send them to your queue as usual!

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On the PLUS plan, you’re limited to 5 tribes (unless you were an early adopter). However, you can purchase unlimited tribe access for an additional fee.

Contributing to Tribes

That brings me to the issue of tribes on Tailwind vs. Tribes on Board Booster. They are totally different, and not automated on Tailwind, so you need to be sure to follow each tribes rules to a T, or you’ll be removed from the tribe.

What you did on Board Booster: With Board Booster tribes, you simply added your pins into the tribe and selected which board you wanted tribe repins to go to. Then Board Booster automated the repinning, making sure everyone’s content had an equal chance to be repinned.

The great thing about that system was that everyone had a chance to get repins. The bad thing about that system is you often ended up with not very well niched tribes, your pins got repinned to irrelevant boards, etc. Also, these pins did not go into your secret feeder boards/scheduler, so using Board Booser tribes could crazy increase how many pins you were pinning each day – which could come across as spammy behavior.

What you need to do on Tailwind: Join niche-relevant tribes and contribute your best pins. Reshare other’s pins by adding to your scheduler queue.

Since each tribe member is responsible for adding pins from the tribe to their queue, and it’s not automated, you get to pick and choose which pins to share. And unlike Board Booster where all tribe pins were forced to go to the same board(s), regardless of relevancy, you can pick a different target board for each pin you decide to use.

The bad thing about Tailwind’s system is your pin may not get picked at all. There’s no guarantee tribe members will choose to repin your content. HOWEVER, if you are creating quality pins and joining niched, relevant, tribes, your chances of getting reshared are good. If you find your pins aren’t getting reshared at all after a period of time (let’s say a month) then you need to either up your pin design game or find a different tribe to join.

You can also create your own tribes, invite members to tribes you belong to, and see how well your pins are performing within each tribe you belong to.

NOTE: Unless you pay for the tribe boost (upgrade), on the PLUS plan you’ll be limited to 5 tribes and 30 pin contributions (total across all tribes) per month. 

Pinning your own original content

What you did on Board Booster: Set up a “scheduled campaign” to enable you to pin your original content pins once to multiple related boards or group boards, based on an interval schedule you set.

What you need to do on Tailwind: Create Board Lists and utilize Intervals.

First, go into the Publisher tab and click on Board Lists. Create groupings of boards you will commonly want to pin the same pin to. For instance, your newest blog post would normally get pinned to x, y, and z personal board plus your 5 blogger group boards. Put all of these boards into a board list and give the list a title that will help you remember when to use it (i.e. new blog post pins).

TIP: Put the MOST relevant board as the first board in the list – I.E your dedicated blog or biz board – or manually pin to the most relevant board and then schedule out the rest. This is important because repins will retain all the SEO information of the first board the pin is pinned to.

Then, whenever you are ready to schedule out your original content, go into the “scheduled pins” section of the publisher and click create new pin. Upload your pin image files from your computer, instagram, or a browser extension button. The uploaded images will go into the drafts section where you can edit urls, descriptions, and choose which boards they should be pinned to.  Choose the board list (marked with a yellow star) you want to use and add any other individual boards that may be relevant to that particular pin.

Then DO NOT click add to queue!!! This is important. In order to add these pins to the scheduler in a LOCKED position, so they won’t get shuffled up and are guaranteed to go out on the right day at a specific time, and be spread over a period of time rather then all at once, you want to use INTERVALS.

You will not see this option until you have selected multiple boards (or a board list), so make sure you have the target boards designated first.

Then look at the bottom of the pin and next to “add to queue” you’ll see “use interval”. Click that. Then click “optimized”. This will put the pin in your scheduler in a LOCKED time spot that is OUTSIDE of your designated time slots already (so your original content won’t take up a time slot, or be at risk of getting shuffled around, and you can be sure you’re keeping a good ratio of your content to other pinner’s content).

You’ll need to select what day and time you want the interval pinning to begin, and how long tailwind should wait before releasing the pin to the next board. I recommend 1 day intervals, unless you have a LOT of boards that pin is going to (like, more than 7). In that case I do some math so that all my boards will get pinned to within a week’s time. So depending on how many boards are getting the pin, your interval might be 8, 10, or 12 hours (for instance).

TIP: I upload about 3-7 original pins per week in order to constantly have fresh content going out

Alright, I think that pretty much covers everything – except looping (and random campaigns from Board Booster, which was essentially another looping feature). Tailwind has Smart Loop in beta right now and I haven’t personally experimented with it, so that will have to be a blog post for another day. Update 8/30/18: I just got invited to the private beta and webinar in September! I’m super excited to get all the best practice deets! I’ll be sure to post and share tips with you!

Hope this guide has helped your transition anxiety and provided some valuable insight into how to use Tailwind (there’s that sneaky affiliate link again – but seriously you should try it!) to effectively manage your pinning strategy! If you have any questions, leave a comment or tag me in our Pinterest Mastermind Community on Facebook!

xoxo

Ready to get started with Tailwind? Click below for your FREE TRIAL!
(affiliate link)

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Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

Why (and how) you should now use hashtags on Pinterest

Why (and HOW) you should be using hashtags on Pinterest.

Oh Hashtags. They have taken over the internet. From #metoo on Twitter to #thisisthelongesthashtagihaveeverwrittenbecauseihavenolifewhatamitalkingabout on Instagram (yes that’s a real hashtag, go look it up), hashtags are literally everywhere. Including Pinterest.

Hashtags on Pinterest are intended to help you find content you are interested in. Because they are new-ish to Pinterest, most hashtags have been simple one or two word keyword phrases such as #giftsforher, #jewelry, #businessquotes, etc. Newer more “designer” hashtags like #nevergiveup, #bossbabe, #itsagirlthing, etc. are just beginning to show up. 

There are still lots of questions about how to use hashtags on Pinterest, but the WHY of it is easy to answer. Hashtags on Pinterest are just one more way your content can be found in a search.

How is this different from just searching Pinterest for the keyword phrase itself? I’m glad you asked!

If you were to type in jewelry, sans hashtag, you would get results based on the most popular and most relevant pins. If you type in #jewelry you are going to get results based on the most recent pins using that hashtag.

That means search results for #jewelry are going to be constantly changing. Which means unless you are using that tag on a significant number of your pins – or are planning to use it on every one of your own pins from now on – you won’t stay at the top of the search results for very long… if a lot of people are using that tag.

FYI: #jewelry has 474,559 pins tagged with that hashtag as of this post’s writing.

Okay, so what’s the recommendations for hashtags on Pinterest then?  Is it worth it to use them? 

Yes, on your own original content pins only. Don’t waste your time hashtagging everying that you repin – just tag your own stuff. Although the hashtag search results will change rapidly, it’s better to attempt to show up than to definitely not show up at all.

That said there’s a few things you can do to make hashtags on Pinterest work better for you:

First, understand that hashtags ONLY work in the description area of PINS. If you’re putting hashtags in your board descriptions, you’re wasting character space and time (for now…who knows? Maybe they’ll introduce hashtags to this space too in the future..)

Second, you do not need to use the entire 500 character descriptions space for hashtags. You should still write in a sentence with at least one keyword phrase in the description area and THEN add your hashtags to the end. Three to five hashtags is plenty, but you can add up to twenty per the Pinterest limits.

Third, you want to try to use the same hashtags over and over again so that you have a greater chance of appearing at the top of search results by having recent pins with that hashtag. Choose hashtags that are relevant to your brand/biz. I personally do not use designer hashtags, yet, because hashtags on Pinterest overall are still so new and it’s just too early to tell which ones will be good/established and which ones will fizzle out.

Now, if you belong to a group of people who are all using a designer hashtag (like #bluefairypinterestrockstars – just kidding, I literally just made that up) then go ahead and use it. But I’d mainly stick to keyword phrases, for now.

Also, you want to keep in mind that the more popular (more pins tagged) a certain hashtag is the faster your content will get lost in the growing sea of content. However, if the hashtag pool is too small, then it’s unlikely that many people are searching for it/using it and your content likewise will just be lost in anonymity.

Alright, so where do we FIND these hashtags? How do we research which ones are good/popular? 

As far as I know, there currently isn’t any database or anything keeping tabs on hashtag counts on Pinterest. (If you know of one or are running one, please drop a comment and tell us where to find this magical resource!)

The only way to know how many pins are using a specific hashtag is to go pin something. Then, before you actually save it to the board, start typing your hashtag in the description area below the pin image. A drop down box of some suggestions will pop up and tell you how many pins are associated with that tag. Keep in mind that what you see is NOT an exhaustive list.

If your tag doesn’t show up in the drop down, you can search for it in the Pinterest search bar (be sure to include the #) to see how much and what kind of content turns up.

If you’re being super serious about Pinterest’s hashtags, it’s probably going to take awhile to find the ones that are best for you and you’ll probably have to change them up every so often as new hashtags gain popularity and others become too popular for your content to compete.

My personal opinion is that, unlike on Instagram or Twitter, hashtags on Pinterest are NOT a make-or-break strategy. This is because they are not the only way to get found or search for content on Pinterest (there are a myriad of ways to be found on Pinterest). As such, it seems counterproductive to spend too much time researching and worrying about them.

Use hashtags on your pins, sure. But honestly? You can probably throw up a few hashtags (try to use the same ones over) on your pins and call it good. Focus your time and attention on creating good SEO elsewhere on Pinterest and consistently pinning quality content, both your own and from other pinners, and you’ll do just fine – even if your hashtags aren’t 100% perfect.

xoxo


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Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

Using Trends to Fuel New Pinterest Board topics

So now that I've lectured all of you lovely readers on WHY you need to create new Pinterest boards regularly (see this post), let's talk about how to beat that brain block and come up with these new board topics regularly. One of the easiest ways to brainstorm a new board topic is to use the Pinterest Discovery tool.

So now that I’ve lectured all of you lovely readers on WHY you need to create new Pinterest boards regularly (see this post), let’s talk about how to beat that brain block and come up with these new board topics regularly.

One of the easiest ways to brainstorm a new board topic is to use the Pinterest Discovery tool. At the top of your Pinterest page, there is an icon that I think looks like a compass (maybe it is, I don’t know). If you click that, you’ll come to a screen that looks like this:

BP103017

This is where you can find what is currently trending as well as new topics and “picked for you” topics.

All of these things are based on what people are currently searching for. In the case of “picked for you”, Pinterest looks at your search habits and pinning habits to compile these suggestions – which is one reason why I always say to pin for your audience and not your own interests (in addition to helping curate a useful Smart Feed).

The topics are presented in keyword friendly phrases that you can use! You might need to tweak the word order or add/subtract words to make them relevant to your audience, but the general root keyword phrases are already there for you to use – no Google keyword tool needed here!

You can click into specific categories at the top to see what’s trending in each category. And often, if you refresh the page, you’ll get different trending keywords each time (sometimes you won’t, but just check back in a few hours or the next day and it has usually changed by then).

Now, similar to the rabbit hole method of searching for group boards, this process can totally suck you in and you’ll end up distracted and scrolling through pictures of delicious cake pops or lifesize lego sculptures or something equally irrelevant. SO, I advise you to set a timer! Also, jotting down keyword phrases as you find them is helpful so that as you dig deeper and deeper, you don’t lose or forget about those previous ideas.

Once you’ve compiled a list of ideas – or your timer has run out – pick the ones that your content would mesh with as your first new board topics to make. Then assign each new board topic a date that you will create, fill, and publish the new board. I like to plan an entire month or two at a time.

Remember to aim for 1-4 new boards each month (on top of your previously established 15 foundational boards).

And also, don’t forget, if any of these trends go out of style (or are seasonal or holiday based), to make them secret and get them out of your board collection so that you don’t look totally out of touch with the current day/season!

xoxo

Psst! I’ve done the work for you!
Download this month’s FREE “What’s Trending?” list from the Resource Library.

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Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

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How to come up with new board topic ideas using the Pinterest discovery tool

Why you should regularly create new Pinterest boards

Whyyou should regularly create new pinterest boards

You already know that boards are the system Pinterest uses for content organization. You’re free to create and curate boards on any topic, use any title, and include any content on these boards from any number of sources including:

  • Pinterest itself
  • Your website or any website with pinnable content (including video content).
  • Your computer via image upload, and attaching a redirect url.

But do you really know how to use this system to your marketing advantage?

If you’re using Pinterest to market your biz/blog, you’re probably in one of two camps:

1) You have no idea what boards to make

or

2) You go crazy making all kinds of boards. Possibly even boards that don’t relate to your target audience at all.

People in camp 2, this post isn’t for you. You typically don’t have a problem coming up with board topics, you have a problem with how you NAME them. So, this post and this post is for you.

Now, back to my camp 1 people.

Over the next few blog posts, I’m going to help you get through this brain block you’re experiencing when it comes to coming up with new board topics.

But before we get to that, it’s important that you realize WHY you need to create new boards.

If you’ve been following the blog or my FB group discussions, then you’ve probably seen me say that you need a minimum of 15 boards. This is your starting point, your baseline, your foundation. These 15 boards are the backbone of your Pinterest account and all future management/growth strategies.

But you can’t stop there.

Repeat, YOU CAN NOT STOP AT 15 BOARDS AND NEVER MAKE ANY MORE.

Why? Recency, that’s why. And SEO.

Part of the algorithm that tells Pinterest that your account, your boards, and your pins are valuable and worth showing to people is how often you actually put new, valuable content out there.

Now, yes, you could simply keep pinning to the same old 15 boards, theoretically forever, and that would count as putting new content out into Pinterest-land.

But here’s what would happen:

  1. Your original 15 boards would get huge. So big that they’d become overwhelming. No one could ever hope to reach the bottom. If you aren’t looping your old pins, those old pins would get lost forever and potentially never be seen again.
  2. Your content would get diluted. If you aren’t looping your pins, your older content is getting pushed farther and farther down and lost amid a sea of other content. Even if you are looping your pins,your content still probably isn’t coming back up often enough, since it will comprise such a small percentage of the total board content.
  3. Your board’s “duplicate content ratio” would skyrocket. Chances are, over long periods of time, you pin the same thing more than once. If you’re recycling pins manually to “loop” them, and you don’t have a process for deleting old or underperforming duplicate copies, then you will potentially have a LOT of duplicate content on your board(s). High duplicate content ratios indicate a lower value to Pinterest and the algorithm is less likely to show/suggest your pins to other users.

So creating new boards routinely isn’t JUST about recency. It’s also about maintaining order and quality.

And I mentioned SEO.

Creating new boards regularly, as part of a strategy for creating order and maintaining recency/quality, ALSO helps your search ranking because it allows for additional keyword phrases to be associated with content on your account. 

This ultimately helps you get found by users, since the number one function of Pinterest is as a search engine.

For example, you have a board for Fall Decor as one of your 15 baseline boards. Creating new boards, like Fall Mantle Decor, Fall Floral Arrangements, Fall Door Wreaths, DIY Fall Home Decor Projects, Autumn Tablescapes, etc.  help associate these additional keyword term phrases with your account.

So that when people use these phrases in the Pinterest search bar, Pinterest matches your boards/account with their search query and shows pins from your account among the search results.

Disclaimer: Recency/activity, relevancy/seo, and visual appeal/pin quality are ALL important to getting ranked higher. So you need to be nailing ALL of those key points.

I do NOT recommend that you go brainstorm and create tons of new boards all at once. While that would help your SEO, that would negate the recency (consistent activity) factor. It’s important to keep those two in balance.

What I recommend then is to create your first 15 boards. You can do these relatively quickly and don’t need to space them out. This gives you an SEO foudation, but also allows room to grow.

Then develop a strategy for creating new boards regularly. I recommend 1 to 4 new boards per month. That’s as little as once a month and as much as once a week.

Personally, when I am planning new boards for clients, I use a spreadsheet (or the Pinterest Planner) and I plan the board titles/topics, plus the dates to release new boards, for 1 to 2 months in advance. Then all I have to do is follow my schedule!

You could also create your new boards as secret in advance, and then just pin to them as you have time. So that when you need to release a new board, you simply toggle one of them from secret to public.

I recommend having 25 pins on each new board you make when it’s publicly visible, regardless of whether you pin to a secret board slowly over time or to a new public board all in once sitting. Give the board some “bulk” from the get go, enough pins on your new board for people who land on it to have something to scroll through.

If this all sounds really daunting to you, I promise it’s easier than it sounds!

Over the next few weeks, we’ll be talking about how to come up with all these new board topics so stay tuned! In the meantime, you might want to brush up on these 10 Pinterest Tips for establishing a good foundation.

Until then,

Whyyou should regularly create new pinterest boards (1)

xoxoDid you know there are EIGHT ready to go Board Topic Lists, based on popular niches/industries, in the Resource Library? These lists give you 15 board topic ideas to use and/or expand on so that you can get your baseline set up quickly and easily. Or you can use the ideas on these lists to fuel your future boards. Either way, you should definitely download these. Visit the Resource Library and grab yours today!

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Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!