Why Group Boards Are NOT the Best Strategy to Get Your Content Seen

Why Group Boards are NOT the best strategy to get your content seen on Pinterest

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links, which means I may receive a small commission, at no cost to you, if you make a purchase through a link, which I’ve indicated as affiliate links in parentheses, like this: (affiliate link).  


Group Boards have been around for a long time, and up until this July they were an integral part of any content creator’s Pinterest strategy.

They are still around, but Pinterest has wised up to the fact that most content creators have been using group boards as a way to disseminate their content to the masses. And they’ve basically said “no more”.

Group boards, per Pinterest, were never meant to be a way to push content to viewers. Pinterest intended group boards to be a feature for pinners, who were collaborating on a project or event, to share pins relevant to that project/event with each other.

In order to get back to that original vision, and to discourage the growth of massive group boards with thousands of pins, Pinterest has DEPRIORITIZED content from group boards.

What does that mean?

Before the algorithm update of 2018, pins that were added to group boards had just as much of a chance of turning up (ranking highly) in search results and in the Smart Feed.

With the de-emphasis of group boards, Pinterest is actively suppressing pins that come from group boards in search results/feeds. Pins that are saved to self-curated, publicly visible boards, are thus “prioritized” over pins that come from group boards.

Does this mean we should leave all of our group boards?

Eventually, this might mean that group boards no longer have a place in your Pinterest strategy. HOWEVER, if you belong to very active, niched, groups where the collaborators are routinely visiting that board and repinning content from that board, I wouldn’t leave it just yet.

Because although the pins to add to that board may not be discovered in searches/feeds, they are still findable by group board members when they visit the board, and they may repin your content.

So, bottom line, what’s the recommendation? What should we do instead?

Only your individual Pinterest/Tailwind stats and website traffic can really tell you the right answer here. Just keep in mind that you can’t solely rely on group boards for your exposure now.

But you should definitely be keeping an eye on your pins and how they are performing on your group boards. If your pins are still getting repinned from those boards, if the boards themselves seem high quality, and if leaving the board(s) would cause a significant decrease in your reach/traffic – then I’d suggest that you keep the group board and keep contributing to it, until it’s no longer performing well.

Meanwhile, ALSO invest time into Tailwind Tribes (affiliate link). Find tribes that are active. Add some pins to the tribe and see how they perform. Over time, you may wish to replace pinning to group boards with tribe contributions completely.

ADDITIONALLY, be sure you are focusing on:

  • curating high quality boards of your own
  • using good SEO in all the key places
  • releasing fresh pin content on a consistent basis

xoxo


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Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

 
Tailwind Visual Marketing Suite

5 Cool New Pinterest Features

5 cool new pinterest features - August 2018 Edition.

 

Do you ever log into Pinterest and suddenly notice that things are a bit different?

I know, you’re thinking, “Who hasn’t?” Because it does indeed seem like Pinterest is CONSTANTLY changing things up. And while it can sometimes get annoying, because glitches, it’s also one of the things I love most about Pinterest. They truly do focus on creating features and experiences that users want.

Boards within boards? We asked and we got it!
Be able to move pins around? We asked and we got it!

Well, you might not have asked for these features specifically, but we think they are pretty cool – and just go to show how the Pinterest team is always thinking about how to make things better!

Multiple Log-in Toggle 

We (the collective pinning community) have been asking for this for what seems like FOREVER and it looks like we might  be are finally getting it!

I’ve only seen it under the Ads section, where you can add another ad account (or have someone share an ad account with you), so they *might* still be testing this feature. I am over the MOON excited though because I suspect this is going to lead into having a multiple account toggle for the login screen too (HA! I was right). If you have multiple accounts, perhaps a personal and a business account, or if you’re a Pinterest Manager like me, this feature is going to be a dream come true!!

UPDATE: 8/20/18 I found the multiple account toggle today! It’s under the three dots at the top right of the “toolbar” – where you’d also find “settings” and “logout”. FYI Pinterest Managers, it looks like currently, you can only add up to 4 accounts to switch between – but that’s better than nothing!!!

Combining Boards

Another great feature, which I discovered quite by accident, is the ability to combine boards SO SUPER EASILY that you actually kind of have to be careful not to ACCIDENTALLy do it.

What I mean is, you can now drag an entire board INTO another board and it will automatically create a new sub-board within the parent board. Pins from board A (the board you are moving) will automatically be moved over into the new sub-board on Board B, and Board A will be removed from your board lineup. How great is that?!

A word of caution though, I’ve nearly accidentally combined boards when simply trying to rearrange my boards via drag and drop. Be sure you know where you are dropping your board! And if you get a little pop up box, do NOT just automatically hit OK without reading, because you might just combine a board you didn’t mean to – and there’s no easy way to undo it.

Audience Insights

Pinterest Analytics are undergoing some updates as well. One of the things that has recently been introduced is audience insights. This report allows you to see what categories and general topics your followers are pinning. You can also toggle to see what interest trends are for ALL Pinterest users.

Additionally, this report shows you age and gender demographics, as well as what devices your followers are using (i.e. iphone, android tablet, ipad, etc.), and what countries and cities you reach.

More Ideas (for sub-boards)

Whenever you click into one of your main boards, you might see a little button at the top for “more ideas”. Pinterest seems to be trying to get users to actually utilize the sub-board feature more and is providing a few keyword topics that they think would be relevant or related to your main board topic. If you click on one of these suggested keyword phrases, Pinterest will automatically add a sub-board named with that phrase to your main board.

This doesn’t seem terribly refined yet, sometimes the suggestions aren’t a good match, but it’s a good feature to help you think of how to expand the board’s focus and bring in new related content – plus it SEO titles the sub-board for you!

Smaller Pin Thumbnails

If you have a board with hundreds or thousands of pins, it can be difficult to ever really see ALL the content that is on the board. You’d have to scroll endlessly forever to reach the bottom where the oldest pins live.

Pinterest has added a new button for a smaller thumbnails view, right within whatever board you are viewing. It’s at the top right of the board’s pins. Clicking it makes everything smaller and thus you can see MORE pins on one screen. I haven’t checked to see if this feature is on the mobile app, but it makes sense that for mobile users this would be an invaluable feature – since you have less screen real estate to work with.

I know there are likely many more features and changes Pinterest will introduce — It’s kind of their MO — so if you’re seeing a new feature I missed, please let me know!

I’ve got my fingers crossed for that multiple log-in toggle (CHECK!)…. and a business category (still).

xoxo

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Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

The Ultimate Guide To Making The Switch From Board Booster To Tailwind

Switching from Board Booster to Tailwind: Best Practices

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links, which means I may receive a small commission, at no cost to you, if you make a purchase through a link, which I’ve indicated as affiliate links in parentheses, like this: (affiliate link).  


The Pinterest Marketing world was shaken up quite a bit in late June of this year when Board Booster shut down amid talks with Pinterest regarding partner status. Unfortunately for all of us that loved Board Booster for it’s unique features, we’ve been left to adjust our pinning strategy to either manual pinning only or to one of the official Pinterest pin-scheduler partners (say THAT five times fast!). That leaves Hootsuite, Buffer, and Tailwind (affiliate link – Yes, I’m an affiliate now ya’ll – that’s how much I’m a believer!) as our current options.

Of these three, Tailwind is by far the most robust and will be the easiest transition for previous Board Booster users. You can accomplish many of the same things with Tailwind as you did with Board Booster, just the mechanics of it are a bit different. Honestly, what took me the most time to get used to was the user interface of Tailwind. Once you learn where everything is and how it works and/or replaces previous Board Booster features (may they rest in peace), using Tailwind to manage your pinning strategy will be just as easy as it was before.

I’ve even discovered a few new tricks with Tailwind that make sourcing pins for your scheduler way easier than it ever was in Board Booster.

The biggest plus for making the switch though? Tailwind as an official partner (affiliate link) doesn’t violate the TOS of Pinterest and so there is no risk of your account or pins being penalized for being published through this program. And with Pinterest putting extra focus on new, fresh, pins (versus repins), Tailwind provides some security there too – whenever you pin the same pin to multiple boards via Tailwind, each instance of that pin is a “fresh” pin – not a copy (repin) of the original. Mischief managed! (Harry Potter fans unite!)

Okay, so ALL that said, HOW do you take that lovely streamlined easy peasy pinterest strategy you had all figured out in Board Booster and transfer it over to Tailwind without giving yourself a grade A migraine in the process?

Introducing…. THE BLUE FAIRY STUDIOS ULTIMATE GUIDE TO MAKING THE SWITCH FROM BOARD BOOSTER TO TAILWIND! (Ta-da!)

Setting up the scheduler (Tailwind’s Publisher feature)

What you did in Board Booster: Selected the boards you wanted to pin to and set up dates, times, and number of pins for each board. Board Booster created secret boards which you then curated your pins onto and BB took care of releasing them to your publicly visible boards according to the schedule you set up.

What you need to do in Tailwind: Identify how many times you want to pin each day to your various boards, TOTAL. Create a smart schedule in the publisher under “your schedule”. Tell tailwind how many times per day you want to post. I recommend 20-30.  It will generate a schedule for each day of the week with recommended time slots that you can edit, delete, or add to.

NOTE: each day will probably NOT have the exact number of pin times you requested. For instance if you chose to pin 20 times per day, some days may have more than 20 and some days may have less than 20, but over the course of a week, the pinning AVERAGE will be 20/day.

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Screenshot of the “Your Schedule” screen after generating a new smart schedule in Tailwind. Don’t forget to set your timezone!

Adding Pins to Publisher

What you did in Board Booster: browsed Pinterest and pin directly to secret feeder boards.

What you need to to in Tailwind: source pins  within Tailwind itself, as well as within Pinterest using the Tailwind extension. I’ll cover some of the unique ways to source pins from within Tailwind in a bit. For now, let’s focus on what happens when we source a pin from within Pinterest.

Whenever you want to add a pin to add to the publisher from within Pinterest, you’ll want to click the tailwind icon that appears when you hover over the pin. Then choose which board you want to pin to. From there the easiest thing to do is to simply add to queue – since you’ve got this lovely smart schedule all set up. Don’t worry about it if you’re adding a bunch of pins to the same board in a row. Once you are done adding all your pins, you can simply visit the “Scheduled Pins” section under the Publisher feature and shuffle the queue a few times to mix them up. However, you CAN also assign specific dates/times to each pin at the time of pinning. To do this, just click the little clock in the corner of the pin preview that pops up after clicking the tailwind icon.

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Add a board, or several, and click add to queue! Make sure there is a source URL, Tailwind won’t allow you to schedule any pins without a source URL.

Within the “scheduled pins” screen itself, you can drag pins around to different time slots, lock pins in place so they don’t get shuffled, and send scheduled pins back to drafts for editing. Just click and drag the thumbnails or click the timestamp on the larger pin views to the left to edit.

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Just click to edit any part of a pin – time, target board, description, or url. PLUS, send pin to twitter or facebook page right from the interface! The lock symbol means this pin won’t move when the queue is shuffled.

Sourcing Pins (from within Tailwind):

Maybe you used the Pin Sourcing feature on Board Booster to automatically find pins for you based on a board, or a keyword search term, etc. Tailwind doesn’t have that feature, but it does have a few different ways to help you find quality, relevant, content to reshare to your own boards and fill up your scheduler.

One such way to find related content is to hop over to the “published pins” screen, under the Publisher feature. There you’ll see pins you’ve added recently. You can filter these by board, by category, and by url source. Then you can look at the pins that performed the best and click “find similar content”. From the pop-up screen, you can refresh the suggestions over and over if you’d like.

You can also repeat this same process from the “pin inspector” screen under “insights”.

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Previously published pins, filtered by board title, and sorted by repin count. You can reschedule the pin, add to tribes, and/or find similar content from this screen.

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What you see if you click find similar content. Refresh as needed. Add to schedule as you would any other pin.

Another way to find relevant pin content is to head over to the “Insights” tab and click “Board Insights”. This screen will show you a report of your individual boards’ performances including the number of pins on the board, number of people following the board, number of repins from the board, a virality score (tailwind specific metric), and engagement score (tailwind specific metric).

I like to deselect group and secret boards so it only shows the boards you have publicly visible and that you curated yourself. From there, you simply click the find similar content button for the board of your choice, and add pins to the queue as usual.

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I focus on adding pins to boards that are performing the best, to keep them active and draw in traffic.

The last way to source pins from within Tailwind is via the Tribes feature. You’ll have to look for tribes that fit your niche well and then you simply browse the pins that have been added to that tribe and send them to your queue as usual!

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On the PLUS plan, you’re limited to 5 tribes (unless you were an early adopter). However, you can purchase unlimited tribe access for an additional fee.

Contributing to Tribes

That brings me to the issue of tribes on Tailwind vs. Tribes on Board Booster. They are totally different, and not automated on Tailwind, so you need to be sure to follow each tribes rules to a T, or you’ll be removed from the tribe.

What you did on Board Booster: With Board Booster tribes, you simply added your pins into the tribe and selected which board you wanted tribe repins to go to. Then Board Booster automated the repinning, making sure everyone’s content had an equal chance to be repinned.

The great thing about that system was that everyone had a chance to get repins. The bad thing about that system is you often ended up with not very well niched tribes, your pins got repinned to irrelevant boards, etc. Also, these pins did not go into your secret feeder boards/scheduler, so using Board Booser tribes could crazy increase how many pins you were pinning each day – which could come across as spammy behavior.

What you need to do on Tailwind: Join niche-relevant tribes and contribute your best pins. Reshare other’s pins by adding to your scheduler queue.

Since each tribe member is responsible for adding pins from the tribe to their queue, and it’s not automated, you get to pick and choose which pins to share. And unlike Board Booster where all tribe pins were forced to go to the same board(s), regardless of relevancy, you can pick a different target board for each pin you decide to use.

The bad thing about Tailwind’s system is your pin may not get picked at all. There’s no guarantee tribe members will choose to repin your content. HOWEVER, if you are creating quality pins and joining niched, relevant, tribes, your chances of getting reshared are good. If you find your pins aren’t getting reshared at all after a period of time (let’s say a month) then you need to either up your pin design game or find a different tribe to join.

You can also create your own tribes, invite members to tribes you belong to, and see how well your pins are performing within each tribe you belong to.

NOTE: Unless you pay for the tribe boost (upgrade), on the PLUS plan you’ll be limited to 5 tribes and 30 pin contributions (total across all tribes) per month. 

Pinning your own original content

What you did on Board Booster: Set up a “scheduled campaign” to enable you to pin your original content pins once to multiple related boards or group boards, based on an interval schedule you set.

What you need to do on Tailwind: Create Board Lists and utilize Intervals.

First, go into the Publisher tab and click on Board Lists. Create groupings of boards you will commonly want to pin the same pin to. For instance, your newest blog post would normally get pinned to x, y, and z personal board plus your 5 blogger group boards. Put all of these boards into a board list and give the list a title that will help you remember when to use it (i.e. new blog post pins).

TIP: Put the MOST relevant board as the first board in the list – I.E your dedicated blog or biz board – or manually pin to the most relevant board and then schedule out the rest. This is important because repins will retain all the SEO information of the first board the pin is pinned to.

Then, whenever you are ready to schedule out your original content, go into the “scheduled pins” section of the publisher and click create new pin. Upload your pin image files from your computer, instagram, or a browser extension button. The uploaded images will go into the drafts section where you can edit urls, descriptions, and choose which boards they should be pinned to.  Choose the board list (marked with a yellow star) you want to use and add any other individual boards that may be relevant to that particular pin.

Then DO NOT click add to queue!!! This is important. In order to add these pins to the scheduler in a LOCKED position, so they won’t get shuffled up and are guaranteed to go out on the right day at a specific time, and be spread over a period of time rather then all at once, you want to use INTERVALS.

You will not see this option until you have selected multiple boards (or a board list), so make sure you have the target boards designated first.

Then look at the bottom of the pin and next to “add to queue” you’ll see “use interval”. Click that. Then click “optimized”. This will put the pin in your scheduler in a LOCKED time spot that is OUTSIDE of your designated time slots already (so your original content won’t take up a time slot, or be at risk of getting shuffled around, and you can be sure you’re keeping a good ratio of your content to other pinner’s content).

You’ll need to select what day and time you want the interval pinning to begin, and how long tailwind should wait before releasing the pin to the next board. I recommend 1 day intervals, unless you have a LOT of boards that pin is going to (like, more than 7). In that case I do some math so that all my boards will get pinned to within a week’s time. So depending on how many boards are getting the pin, your interval might be 8, 10, or 12 hours (for instance).

TIP: I upload about 3-7 original pins per week in order to constantly have fresh content going out

Alright, I think that pretty much covers everything – except looping (and random campaigns from Board Booster, which was essentially another looping feature). Tailwind has Smart Loop in beta right now and I haven’t personally experimented with it, so that will have to be a blog post for another day. Update 8/30/18: I just got invited to the private beta and webinar in September! I’m super excited to get all the best practice deets! I’ll be sure to post and share tips with you!

Hope this guide has helped your transition anxiety and provided some valuable insight into how to use Tailwind (there’s that sneaky affiliate link again – but seriously you should try it!) to effectively manage your pinning strategy! If you have any questions, leave a comment or tag me in our Pinterest Mastermind Community on Facebook!

xoxo

Ready to get started with Tailwind? Click below for your FREE TRIAL!
(affiliate link)

Tailwind Visual Marketing Suite


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Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

Your Pin Imagery Matters (probably more than you think!)

You probably think of a Pinterest pin as the image you see when you scroll through your Smart Feed. And you’re partially right. In reality, a pin has several components: an image, a description, and a link.

In this post, we’re going to discuss your pin images. I know waaaaaay too many bloggers and biz owners and wannabe Pinterest power users who have really really bad pin images. They put so much effort into their SEO and group board hunting, but when it comes time to pin their own stuff – somehow SOMEHOW, a vast majority of internet users think they can rush past this super important part of their Pinterest strategy.

Image quality is brushed off so many times….SO many times that I am writing an entire blog post about it. It’s really insane.

“I don’t have time to make new pins” 
“I know I need to resize all my images”
“I’m going to do [x, y, z] and then I’ll tackle my product photograpy”

You’re killing me, Smalls.

Because even if they KNOW it needs to be done, it’s never their top priority. It gets pushed back and back and back, until a year has gone by, they still haven’t fixed their pin images and they are wondering why Pinterest “failed” them.

Pinterest didn’t fail them. They failed Pinterest.

I don’t know where the idea came from that you can pin sub-quality, wrong sized, images to start with and just “fix it later” came from, but I’m here to tell you that unless you intend to spend a good amount of effort and energy and time making quality pin images (photos, graphics, etc.) THEN YOU DON’T NEED TO BE FOCUSING ON PINTEREST AT ALL.

Ouch. I know. I mean, I love Pinterest, and I really want you all to be able to leverage it for your blogs and businesses, but if you can’t do this one very important thing – then everything else you do on Pinterest will be in vain.

Not to mention, your pin’s image is like your brand ambassador. It’s the first thing your audience is seeing of you and your biz/blog. WHY would you want that first impression to be anything but ridiculously, out of this word, good?!

Because the quality of your pin on Pinterest matters SO much. Beyond simply looking “pretty” or having clear photography, a pin’s image quality plays a vital part in the Pinterest algorithm.

Pinterest puts a very high value on image quality. High quality, and creative, unique pins, with a vertical pin ratio (2:3) get more views, more saves, and more clicks. Pinterest is more likely to suggest your pins to other pinners, and rank them higher in search results, if your pin imagery is top notch.

It is not enough to pin a product on a white background and call it a day.

It is not enough to take a picture of the dinner  or craft or whatever in front of you, in poor lighting, and upload it as a small square image pin and call it good.

It is not enough to use the same stock photo, or biz picture of yourself, over and over and over and use the same poor text layout to pin all of your blog posts. While the first pin might have been beautiful, the subsequent ones are no longer unique. And they all look the SAME — boooring!

SO what makes a good pin?

Size: Pinterest is now recommending 600×900 as the ideal pin aspect ratio. Since many users are mobile, this size is mobile friendly. I personally use 800×1200 and you can go up to 1500px long without your pin being cut off on desktop. On mobile, users may have to click for a closeup to view the whole of longer pins

Photos: Bright, clear, with good composition. If you don’t know anything about photography and are trying to pass off crappy phone pics as pins, please do yourself a favor and go learn some photography basics. Composition, light, and white balance is a good start. Stock photos are okay, with some graphic/text overlay (see graphics below). Lifestyle images do much better than plain product shots. If you’re selling a physical good, images of the product in use or styled photos are always going to be better than a single product shot on a plain solid color or gradient background.

Graphics: Like photography, graphics need to have good composition and balance. Your text should be easy to read. Your text to image ratio should favor imagery over text. Your text should be concise and add value to your pin image, to clarify the content or purpose of the pin.
There’s a whole page in the Pinterest for business help articles dedicated to helping you style your pins. I’d highly recommend reading it. (You can find it HERE.)

If you’re just starting out on Pinterest as a blogger or business owner, GET YOUR IMAGERY IN ORDER first before diving into a more comprehensive pinning strategy. If you need a brand strategist or photographer, get one. If you aren’t good with graphic design, reach out to me – I’d love to help you by designing pins for your content!

But whatever you do, please please don’t pin this:

(get it? worst pin ever? haha, I crack myself up)

xo,

xoxo
For more Pinterest tips, tutorials, and other resources to help you become a pinning ninja, become a member of the Blue Fairy Studios Pinterest Academy!

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Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

 

 

Free Pin Templates! Download NOW!

FREEPin Templates!

 

If you’ve been around for a while, you probably know about the resource library. (If you don’t know about it, you should totally go check it out!) And if you know about the resource library, you know that I try to release a new “resource” each month – be that a video tutorial or a new list of board ideas or a new pack of pin templates…

I’ve been a bit behind this year getting new things added, because I’ve been struggling a bit with the hosting platform for the library. Thinkific is nice, don’t get me wrong, but it’s a bit cumbersome to have yet ANOTHER place you have to bookmark and remember to visit.

So, I’ve been learning and working on building a separate area onto this website for library members only! And I FINALLY got it all worked out this week! YAY!!

It’s not 100% done, and it’s not as “pretty” as I’d like it to be – but it’s all there!

To celebrate, I spent some time today designing TEN new Pin Templates for you!

And guess what! They are FREE to EVERYONE! That’s right, you do not need to be a library member to grab one (or all) of these templates.

My Pin Templates are designed with built in space for your text overlay for quotes or blog post titles or whatever. They are saved as flattened .png images so you can use them as “backgrounds” in any photo/graphics program. If you’re a Canva user, simply download the image then upload into Canva – select “Blog Post” as your graphics size and select the template from your uploads folder and VOILA! JUST ADD TEXT!!

Super easy!

There’s a whole bunch more templates IN the library, and I release new ones all the time! (I’m even working on getting a professional photographer to provide stock images – so that means even MORE templates!)

Like I said, you don’t have to be a member to grab THESE free templates, which have a really cool abstract theme so they’ll work for a variety of content. But if you want more, PLUS a whole slew of Pinterest educational materials (like, how to find good group boards, and a whole webinar series on how to even begin using Pinterest in the first place, etc. etc. ) then you’ll want to become a member so you have access to all the goods.

DOWNLOAD YOUR FREE PIN TEMPLATES HERE

Thanks for being part of my community!

xoxo


FREE Pinterest MINI Course

 

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Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

Why (and how) you should now use hashtags on Pinterest

Why (and HOW) you should be using hashtags on Pinterest.

Oh Hashtags. They have taken over the internet. From #metoo on Twitter to #thisisthelongesthashtagihaveeverwrittenbecauseihavenolifewhatamitalkingabout on Instagram (yes that’s a real hashtag, go look it up), hashtags are literally everywhere. Including Pinterest.

Hashtags on Pinterest are intended to help you find content you are interested in. Because they are new-ish to Pinterest, most hashtags have been simple one or two word keyword phrases such as #giftsforher, #jewelry, #businessquotes, etc. Newer more “designer” hashtags like #nevergiveup, #bossbabe, #itsagirlthing, etc. are just beginning to show up. 

There are still lots of questions about how to use hashtags on Pinterest, but the WHY of it is easy to answer. Hashtags on Pinterest are just one more way your content can be found in a search.

How is this different from just searching Pinterest for the keyword phrase itself? I’m glad you asked!

If you were to type in jewelry, sans hashtag, you would get results based on the most popular and most relevant pins. If you type in #jewelry you are going to get results based on the most recent pins using that hashtag.

That means search results for #jewelry are going to be constantly changing. Which means unless you are using that tag on a significant number of your pins – or are planning to use it on every one of your own pins from now on – you won’t stay at the top of the search results for very long… if a lot of people are using that tag.

FYI: #jewelry has 474,559 pins tagged with that hashtag as of this post’s writing.

Okay, so what’s the recommendations for hashtags on Pinterest then?  Is it worth it to use them? 

Yes, on your own original content pins only. Don’t waste your time hashtagging everying that you repin – just tag your own stuff. Although the hashtag search results will change rapidly, it’s better to attempt to show up than to definitely not show up at all.

That said there’s a few things you can do to make hashtags on Pinterest work better for you:

First, understand that hashtags ONLY work in the description area of PINS. If you’re putting hashtags in your board descriptions, you’re wasting character space and time (for now…who knows? Maybe they’ll introduce hashtags to this space too in the future..)

Second, you do not need to use the entire 500 character descriptions space for hashtags. You should still write in a sentence with at least one keyword phrase in the description area and THEN add your hashtags to the end. Three to five hashtags is plenty, but you can add up to twenty per the Pinterest limits.

Third, you want to try to use the same hashtags over and over again so that you have a greater chance of appearing at the top of search results by having recent pins with that hashtag. Choose hashtags that are relevant to your brand/biz. I personally do not use designer hashtags, yet, because hashtags on Pinterest overall are still so new and it’s just too early to tell which ones will be good/established and which ones will fizzle out.

Now, if you belong to a group of people who are all using a designer hashtag (like #bluefairypinterestrockstars – just kidding, I literally just made that up) then go ahead and use it. But I’d mainly stick to keyword phrases, for now.

Also, you want to keep in mind that the more popular (more pins tagged) a certain hashtag is the faster your content will get lost in the growing sea of content. However, if the hashtag pool is too small, then it’s unlikely that many people are searching for it/using it and your content likewise will just be lost in anonymity.

Alright, so where do we FIND these hashtags? How do we research which ones are good/popular? 

As far as I know, there currently isn’t any database or anything keeping tabs on hashtag counts on Pinterest. (If you know of one or are running one, please drop a comment and tell us where to find this magical resource!)

The only way to know how many pins are using a specific hashtag is to go pin something. Then, before you actually save it to the board, start typing your hashtag in the description area below the pin image. A drop down box of some suggestions will pop up and tell you how many pins are associated with that tag. Keep in mind that what you see is NOT an exhaustive list.

If your tag doesn’t show up in the drop down, you can search for it in the Pinterest search bar (be sure to include the #) to see how much and what kind of content turns up.

If you’re being super serious about Pinterest’s hashtags, it’s probably going to take awhile to find the ones that are best for you and you’ll probably have to change them up every so often as new hashtags gain popularity and others become too popular for your content to compete.

My personal opinion is that, unlike on Instagram or Twitter, hashtags on Pinterest are NOT a make-or-break strategy. This is because they are not the only way to get found or search for content on Pinterest (there are a myriad of ways to be found on Pinterest). As such, it seems counterproductive to spend too much time researching and worrying about them.

Use hashtags on your pins, sure. But honestly? You can probably throw up a few hashtags (try to use the same ones over) on your pins and call it good. Focus your time and attention on creating good SEO elsewhere on Pinterest and consistently pinning quality content, both your own and from other pinners, and you’ll do just fine – even if your hashtags aren’t 100% perfect.

xoxo


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Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

How to Strategically Use Pinterest Board Sections

How to use Pinterest Board Sections, strategically for your business and marketing.

Happy 2018! Yeah, I know it’s been 2018 for a whole month now. I’m just now getting back in the full groove of things. It’s been a terrible flu season and my house was NOT exempt. :/

However, I’m back and here to tell you ALL about Pinterest’s Board Sections feature. This feature has been out for several months now, but it still seems like there are LOTS of questions about how to use them from a business/marketing vantage.

Here are some of the questions I’ve been hearing since Pinterest released the new Board Sections feature.

  • How many is too many?
  • Should ALL your boards have sections?
  • What is a good balance between creating Board Sections and just creating a new board?
  • How many pins should you put in a board section?
  • Is it okay to have pins on your board at the bottom under your board sections?
  • Do Board Sections help SEO?

After working with Board Sections and implementing them for my clients, I’ve come up with a these recommendations:

1) I recommend that you never have fewer than 15 baseline boards on your page. You definitely don’t want to section your boards up so much that you neglect to keep enough main boards on your page. So before you go combining boards and making sections, be sure you have at least 15 main boards (not including group boards) on your account.

2) Not ALL boards need sections. Board Sections work well for larger boards or very general topic boards. Your Main Biz or Blog board, SHOULD have sections to help viewers find specific content easier. Use shop sections, product types, blog categories, etc. as the basis for your sections.

3) You do not need a million sections. 3 to 5 Board Sections on a board is plenty. If you need more than that, you’re probably better off creating whole new boards.

4) I always recommend having a minimum of 25 pins on a main board. For Board Sections, I am recommending putting, at the very minimum, 10 pins into each section. Don’t make more sections than you can fill! And yes, it is OK to have pins on the main board underneath your board sections (pins that aren’t sorted into a section).

5) Board Sections DO help with your SEO, the same way keyword phrases in your main board descriptions do. HOWEVER, at this time, Main Board TITLES carry the MOST SEO weight. That is because they are directly searchable (you can filter your search by board title).

I hope this helps clear some things up! If you have a question I didn’t answer, let me know in the comments – or pop over to our Pinterest Mastermind Community on Facebook and let’s talk about it!

xoxo


 

 

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Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!