Free Pin Templates! Download NOW!

FREEPin Templates!

 

If you’ve been around for a while, you probably know about the resource library. (If you don’t know about it, you should totally go check it out!) And if you know about the resource library, you know that I try to release a new “resource” each month – be that a video tutorial or a new list of board ideas or a new pack of pin templates…

I’ve been a bit behind this year getting new things added, because I’ve been struggling a bit with the hosting platform for the library. Thinkific is nice, don’t get me wrong, but it’s a bit cumbersome to have yet ANOTHER place you have to bookmark and remember to visit.

So, I’ve been learning and working on building a separate area onto this website for library members only! And I FINALLY got it all worked out this week! YAY!!

It’s not 100% done, and it’s not as “pretty” as I’d like it to be – but it’s all there!

To celebrate, I spent some time today designing TEN new Pin Templates for you!

And guess what! They are FREE to EVERYONE! That’s right, you do not need to be a library member to grab one (or all) of these templates.

My Pin Templates are designed with built in space for your text overlay for quotes or blog post titles or whatever. They are saved as flattened .png images so you can use them as “backgrounds” in any photo/graphics program. If you’re a Canva user, simply download the image then upload into Canva – select “Blog Post” as your graphics size and select the template from your uploads folder and VOILA! JUST ADD TEXT!!

Super easy!

There’s a whole bunch more templates IN the library, and I release new ones all the time! (I’m even working on getting a professional photographer to provide stock images – so that means even MORE templates!)

Like I said, you don’t have to be a member to grab THESE free templates, which have a really cool abstract theme so they’ll work for a variety of content. But if you want more, PLUS a whole slew of Pinterest educational materials (like, how to find good group boards, and a whole webinar series on how to even begin using Pinterest in the first place, etc. etc. ) then you’ll want to become a member so you have access to all the goods.

DOWNLOAD YOUR FREE PIN TEMPLATES HERE

Thanks for being part of my community!

xoxo


FREE Pinterest MINI Course

 

blogpic icon

Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

Why (and how) you should now use hashtags on Pinterest

Why (and HOW) you should be using hashtags on Pinterest.

Oh Hashtags. They have taken over the internet. From #metoo on Twitter to #thisisthelongesthashtagihaveeverwrittenbecauseihavenolifewhatamitalkingabout on Instagram (yes that’s a real hashtag, go look it up), hashtags are literally everywhere. Including Pinterest.

Hashtags on Pinterest are intended to help you find content you are interested in. Because they are new-ish to Pinterest, most hashtags have been simple one or two word keyword phrases such as #giftsforher, #jewelry, #businessquotes, etc. Newer more “designer” hashtags like #nevergiveup, #bossbabe, #itsagirlthing, etc. are just beginning to show up. 

There are still lots of questions about how to use hashtags on Pinterest, but the WHY of it is easy to answer. Hashtags on Pinterest are just one more way your content can be found in a search.

How is this different from just searching Pinterest for the keyword phrase itself? I’m glad you asked!

If you were to type in jewelry, sans hashtag, you would get results based on the most popular and most relevant pins. If you type in #jewelry you are going to get results based on the most recent pins using that hashtag.

That means search results for #jewelry are going to be constantly changing. Which means unless you are using that tag on a significant number of your pins – or are planning to use it on every one of your own pins from now on – you won’t stay at the top of the search results for very long… if a lot of people are using that tag.

FYI: #jewelry has 474,559 pins tagged with that hashtag as of this post’s writing.

Okay, so what’s the recommendations for hashtags on Pinterest then?  Is it worth it to use them? 

Yes, on your own original content pins only. Don’t waste your time hashtagging everying that you repin – just tag your own stuff. Although the hashtag search results will change rapidly, it’s better to attempt to show up than to definitely not show up at all.

That said there’s a few things you can do to make hashtags on Pinterest work better for you:

First, understand that hashtags ONLY work in the description area of PINS. If you’re putting hashtags in your board descriptions, you’re wasting character space and time (for now…who knows? Maybe they’ll introduce hashtags to this space too in the future..)

Second, you do not need to use the entire 500 character descriptions space for hashtags. You should still write in a sentence with at least one keyword phrase in the description area and THEN add your hashtags to the end. Three to five hashtags is plenty, but you can add up to twenty per the Pinterest limits.

Third, you want to try to use the same hashtags over and over again so that you have a greater chance of appearing at the top of search results by having recent pins with that hashtag. Choose hashtags that are relevant to your brand/biz. I personally do not use designer hashtags, yet, because hashtags on Pinterest overall are still so new and it’s just too early to tell which ones will be good/established and which ones will fizzle out.

Now, if you belong to a group of people who are all using a designer hashtag (like #bluefairypinterestrockstars – just kidding, I literally just made that up) then go ahead and use it. But I’d mainly stick to keyword phrases, for now.

Also, you want to keep in mind that the more popular (more pins tagged) a certain hashtag is the faster your content will get lost in the growing sea of content. However, if the hashtag pool is too small, then it’s unlikely that many people are searching for it/using it and your content likewise will just be lost in anonymity.

Alright, so where do we FIND these hashtags? How do we research which ones are good/popular? 

As far as I know, there currently isn’t any database or anything keeping tabs on hashtag counts on Pinterest. (If you know of one or are running one, please drop a comment and tell us where to find this magical resource!)

The only way to know how many pins are using a specific hashtag is to go pin something. Then, before you actually save it to the board, start typing your hashtag in the description area below the pin image. A drop down box of some suggestions will pop up and tell you how many pins are associated with that tag. Keep in mind that what you see is NOT an exhaustive list.

If your tag doesn’t show up in the drop down, you can search for it in the Pinterest search bar (be sure to include the #) to see how much and what kind of content turns up.

If you’re being super serious about Pinterest’s hashtags, it’s probably going to take awhile to find the ones that are best for you and you’ll probably have to change them up every so often as new hashtags gain popularity and others become too popular for your content to compete.

My personal opinion is that, unlike on Instagram or Twitter, hashtags on Pinterest are NOT a make-or-break strategy. This is because they are not the only way to get found or search for content on Pinterest (there are a myriad of ways to be found on Pinterest). As such, it seems counterproductive to spend too much time researching and worrying about them.

Use hashtags on your pins, sure. But honestly? You can probably throw up a few hashtags (try to use the same ones over) on your pins and call it good. Focus your time and attention on creating good SEO elsewhere on Pinterest and consistently pinning quality content, both your own and from other pinners, and you’ll do just fine – even if your hashtags aren’t 100% perfect.

xoxo


FREE Pinterest MINI Course: get your Pinterest page in shape in just 10 days!

 

blogpic icon

Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

How to Strategically Use Pinterest Board Sections

How to use Pinterest Board Sections, strategically for your business and marketing.

Happy 2018! Yeah, I know it’s been 2018 for a whole month now. I’m just now getting back in the full groove of things. It’s been a terrible flu season and my house was NOT exempt. :/

However, I’m back and here to tell you ALL about Pinterest’s Board Sections feature. This feature has been out for several months now, but it still seems like there are LOTS of questions about how to use them from a business/marketing vantage.

Here are some of the questions I’ve been hearing since Pinterest released the new Board Sections feature.

  • How many is too many?
  • Should ALL your boards have sections?
  • What is a good balance between creating Board Sections and just creating a new board?
  • How many pins should you put in a board section?
  • Is it okay to have pins on your board at the bottom under your board sections?
  • Do Board Sections help SEO?

After working with Board Sections and implementing them for my clients, I’ve come up with a these recommendations:

1) I recommend that you never have fewer than 15 baseline boards on your page. You definitely don’t want to section your boards up so much that you neglect to keep enough main boards on your page. So before you go combining boards and making sections, be sure you have at least 15 main boards (not including group boards) on your account.

2) Not ALL boards need sections. Board Sections work well for larger boards or very general topic boards. Your Main Biz or Blog board, SHOULD have sections to help viewers find specific content easier. Use shop sections, product types, blog categories, etc. as the basis for your sections.

3) You do not need a million sections. 3 to 5 Board Sections on a board is plenty. If you need more than that, you’re probably better off creating whole new boards.

4) I always recommend having a minimum of 25 pins on a main board. For Board Sections, I am recommending putting, at the very minimum, 10 pins into each section. Don’t make more sections than you can fill! And yes, it is OK to have pins on the main board underneath your board sections (pins that aren’t sorted into a section).

5) Board Sections DO help with your SEO, the same way keyword phrases in your main board descriptions do. HOWEVER, at this time, Main Board TITLES carry the MOST SEO weight. That is because they are directly searchable (you can filter your search by board title).

I hope this helps clear some things up! If you have a question I didn’t answer, let me know in the comments – or pop over to our Pinterest Mastermind Community on Facebook and let’s talk about it!

xoxo


 

 

FREE Pinterest MINI Course

 

 

blogpic icon

Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

New Pinterest Features: Hashtags, Board Sections, and PinCodes!

New Pinterest Features - December 2017!

It’s nearing the end of 2017! I don’t know about you but this year has been one wild ride!

If you’ve been following us for a while, you’ve probably noticed that we haven’t been blogging every week lately. That’s because when the holidays hit, starting with Halloween at the end of October, things get a little bit crazy around here! We start planning and prepping for our end of year business shut down and between the extra work up front for our clients, and trying to make time for the other aspects of daily life and family, we just have to let some things go in order to make room for other things.

Sorry if you’ve missed us!

We’re also busy planning for 2018! We have lots of ideas and things to share with you in the new year, and we’ll be looking forward to getting back into the groove once all the big holidays are over!

We’re officially on break beginning December 20th until January 3rd.

But before we go, I’d like to share a few updates with you. You know, since Pinterest has made SO many new changes in the past few months! We’ll be talking more about these cool new features and our expert recommendations for how to best utilize them, when we return from our break!

1) Hashtags are here.

Back in the day, hashtags were a big NO NO on Pinterest. We even wrote a whole post on WHY you shouldn’t use hashtags. This has changed! Hashtags are officially endorsed by Pinterest. Pinterest will even provide you a drop down list of suggested tags to use when you start typing one into a pin description. They ONLY work in pin descriptions, so don’t go hashtagging everything from your bio to boards! Pins only!

2) Board Sections are here.

Pinterest cited their number one requested feature as being a way to organize boards better… boards within boards. Their solution to this is Board Sections. These sections do not get a description of their own and are meant to function to help organize large boards into more focused sub-topics so that viewers can more easily find what they care about. I’ve been talking about these in my Community Group on Facebook, but I’ll be officially releasing my recommendations after the New Year.

3) PinCodes are here.

Pinterest released their version of QC codes and these things are pretty cool! They do not look like your everyday QC code, but they function the same way. You can create a PinCode image for any of your boards. You can then save/download the code to use in PRINT or DIGITALLY. Anyone who scans the code (with a phone app or other QC scanner) will be taken to your board. This has awesome implications for brick and mortar or product based businesses, but they can also be used/scanned digitally from a screen – making them usable to bloggers and other online businesses as well. I’ve already made a quick video tutorial that is available to Resource Library members, so go watch it and be amazed!

Alright, that’s all I have for now! We’ll cover these new features in depth after the New Year! I’m sure you all have PLENTY to keep you busy until then….

(P.S. Don’t forget to catch up on all the awesome webinars and teaching materials in the Resource Library!)

Enjoy the holidays!

 

 

 


Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

 

Using Trends to Fuel New Pinterest Board topics

So now that I've lectured all of you lovely readers on WHY you need to create new Pinterest boards regularly (see this post), let's talk about how to beat that brain block and come up with these new board topics regularly. One of the easiest ways to brainstorm a new board topic is to use the Pinterest Discovery tool.

So now that I’ve lectured all of you lovely readers on WHY you need to create new Pinterest boards regularly (see this post), let’s talk about how to beat that brain block and come up with these new board topics regularly.

One of the easiest ways to brainstorm a new board topic is to use the Pinterest Discovery tool. At the top of your Pinterest page, there is an icon that I think looks like a compass (maybe it is, I don’t know). If you click that, you’ll come to a screen that looks like this:

BP103017

This is where you can find what is currently trending as well as new topics and “picked for you” topics.

All of these things are based on what people are currently searching for. In the case of “picked for you”, Pinterest looks at your search habits and pinning habits to compile these suggestions – which is one reason why I always say to pin for your audience and not your own interests (in addition to helping curate a useful Smart Feed).

The topics are presented in keyword friendly phrases that you can use! You might need to tweak the word order or add/subtract words to make them relevant to your audience, but the general root keyword phrases are already there for you to use – no Google keyword tool needed here!

You can click into specific categories at the top to see what’s trending in each category. And often, if you refresh the page, you’ll get different trending keywords each time (sometimes you won’t, but just check back in a few hours or the next day and it has usually changed by then).

Now, similar to the rabbit hole method of searching for group boards, this process can totally suck you in and you’ll end up distracted and scrolling through pictures of delicious cake pops or lifesize lego sculptures or something equally irrelevant. SO, I advise you to set a timer! Also, jotting down keyword phrases as you find them is helpful so that as you dig deeper and deeper, you don’t lose or forget about those previous ideas.

Once you’ve compiled a list of ideas – or your timer has run out – pick the ones that your content would mesh with as your first new board topics to make. Then assign each new board topic a date that you will create, fill, and publish the new board. I like to plan an entire month or two at a time.

Remember to aim for 1-4 new boards each month (on top of your previously established 15 foundational boards).

And also, don’t forget, if any of these trends go out of style (or are seasonal or holiday based), to make them secret and get them out of your board collection so that you don’t look totally out of touch with the current day/season!

xoxo

Psst! I’ve done the work for you!
Download this month’s FREE “What’s Trending?” list from the Resource Library.

blogpic icon

Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

Join my Facebook Group

Follow me on Pinterest

How to come up with new board topic ideas using the Pinterest discovery tool

Why you should regularly create new Pinterest boards

Whyyou should regularly create new pinterest boards

You already know that boards are the system Pinterest uses for content organization. You’re free to create and curate boards on any topic, use any title, and include any content on these boards from any number of sources including:

  • Pinterest itself
  • Your website or any website with pinnable content (including video content).
  • Your computer via image upload, and attaching a redirect url.

But do you really know how to use this system to your marketing advantage?

If you’re using Pinterest to market your biz/blog, you’re probably in one of two camps:

1) You have no idea what boards to make

or

2) You go crazy making all kinds of boards. Possibly even boards that don’t relate to your target audience at all.

People in camp 2, this post isn’t for you. You typically don’t have a problem coming up with board topics, you have a problem with how you NAME them. So, this post and this post is for you.

Now, back to my camp 1 people.

Over the next few blog posts, I’m going to help you get through this brain block you’re experiencing when it comes to coming up with new board topics.

But before we get to that, it’s important that you realize WHY you need to create new boards.

If you’ve been following the blog or my FB group discussions, then you’ve probably seen me say that you need a minimum of 15 boards. This is your starting point, your baseline, your foundation. These 15 boards are the backbone of your Pinterest account and all future management/growth strategies.

But you can’t stop there.

Repeat, YOU CAN NOT STOP AT 15 BOARDS AND NEVER MAKE ANY MORE.

Why? Recency, that’s why. And SEO.

Part of the algorithm that tells Pinterest that your account, your boards, and your pins are valuable and worth showing to people is how often you actually put new, valuable content out there.

Now, yes, you could simply keep pinning to the same old 15 boards, theoretically forever, and that would count as putting new content out into Pinterest-land.

But here’s what would happen:

  1. Your original 15 boards would get huge. So big that they’d become overwhelming. No one could ever hope to reach the bottom. If you aren’t looping your old pins, those old pins would get lost forever and potentially never be seen again.
  2. Your content would get diluted. If you aren’t looping your pins, your older content is getting pushed farther and farther down and lost amid a sea of other content. Even if you are looping your pins,your content still probably isn’t coming back up often enough, since it will comprise such a small percentage of the total board content.
  3. Your board’s “duplicate content ratio” would skyrocket. Chances are, over long periods of time, you pin the same thing more than once. If you’re recycling pins manually to “loop” them, and you don’t have a process for deleting old or underperforming duplicate copies, then you will potentially have a LOT of duplicate content on your board(s). High duplicate content ratios indicate a lower value to Pinterest and the algorithm is less likely to show/suggest your pins to other users.

So creating new boards routinely isn’t JUST about recency. It’s also about maintaining order and quality.

And I mentioned SEO.

Creating new boards regularly, as part of a strategy for creating order and maintaining recency/quality, ALSO helps your search ranking because it allows for additional keyword phrases to be associated with content on your account. 

This ultimately helps you get found by users, since the number one function of Pinterest is as a search engine.

For example, you have a board for Fall Decor as one of your 15 baseline boards. Creating new boards, like Fall Mantle Decor, Fall Floral Arrangements, Fall Door Wreaths, DIY Fall Home Decor Projects, Autumn Tablescapes, etc.  help associate these additional keyword term phrases with your account.

So that when people use these phrases in the Pinterest search bar, Pinterest matches your boards/account with their search query and shows pins from your account among the search results.

Disclaimer: Recency/activity, relevancy/seo, and visual appeal/pin quality are ALL important to getting ranked higher. So you need to be nailing ALL of those key points.

I do NOT recommend that you go brainstorm and create tons of new boards all at once. While that would help your SEO, that would negate the recency (consistent activity) factor. It’s important to keep those two in balance.

What I recommend then is to create your first 15 boards. You can do these relatively quickly and don’t need to space them out. This gives you an SEO foudation, but also allows room to grow.

Then develop a strategy for creating new boards regularly. I recommend 1 to 4 new boards per month. That’s as little as once a month and as much as once a week.

Personally, when I am planning new boards for clients, I use a spreadsheet (or the Pinterest Planner) and I plan the board titles/topics, plus the dates to release new boards, for 1 to 2 months in advance. Then all I have to do is follow my schedule!

You could also create your new boards as secret in advance, and then just pin to them as you have time. So that when you need to release a new board, you simply toggle one of them from secret to public.

I recommend having 25 pins on each new board you make when it’s publicly visible, regardless of whether you pin to a secret board slowly over time or to a new public board all in once sitting. Give the board some “bulk” from the get go, enough pins on your new board for people who land on it to have something to scroll through.

If this all sounds really daunting to you, I promise it’s easier than it sounds!

Over the next few weeks, we’ll be talking about how to come up with all these new board topics so stay tuned! In the meantime, you might want to brush up on these 10 Pinterest Tips for establishing a good foundation.

Until then,

Whyyou should regularly create new pinterest boards (1)

xoxoDid you know there are EIGHT ready to go Board Topic Lists, based on popular niches/industries, in the Resource Library? These lists give you 15 board topic ideas to use and/or expand on so that you can get your baseline set up quickly and easily. Or you can use the ideas on these lists to fuel your future boards. Either way, you should definitely download these. Visit the Resource Library and grab yours today!

blogpic icon

Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

Why “following back” on Pinterest is a terrible idea

Why Following Back on Pinterest is a TERRIBLE idea, and what to do instead.

I don’t mean to rant, but what is the deal with “follow backs” on Pinterest?

I see it more and more lately as people start turning to Pinterest as a marketing platform – instead of just their Thursday night dinner inspiration.

“I follow back!”

I see it ALLL the time in various facebook groups when someone plunks down their Pinterest URL on a social share thread.

Ugh! For the love of all that is good and holy STOP using the follow back method on Pinterest!

stop treating pinterest like instagram

It’s not the same, it doesn’t work the same, and the follow back method is going to HURT your Pinterest experience and end up causing you a TON of frustration and wasted time.

Here’s the deal:

Pinterest has this thing called a Smart Feed. This smart feed learns your pinning habits, your search habits, and looks at who and what you follow on Pinterest to bring together a nice little collection of pins that you might be interested in, each and every time you visit and in real time as you use Pinterest.

When you blindly follow people back, with no other justification than because they followed you, you are throwing a giant wrench into the whole purpose of the smart feed.

Not only that, but you are actively making it HARDER for you to find content to repin on your own boards that is RELEVANT to your target audience.

Because the whole idea, for business owners and bloggers and anyone who is concerned with getting traffic to their website via Pinterest, is to pin content to your boards that is interesting to your target audience.

What happens when you “follow back”, just because, and without determining if their content is indeed valuable to you as repin content, is you introduce non-relevant content into your smart feed.

Over time as you continue to follow irrelevant accounts and boards, your smart feed becomes entirely useless, full of content you don’t really care about and that your audience won’t care about either.

You should ONLY follow accounts or boards that provide good content that you want to repin for your audience. In this way you will cultivate a smart feed that is relevant and useful.

So when you go to fill up your pin scheduling tool each week (or your secret boards if you are following my recommended Board Booster strategy), it will be super super easy to find content.

So don’t follow back.

If you’ve been following back, I recommend unfollowing 10  irrelevant accounts a week until you get through all of the accounts you follow, so that you’re only left with the ones that provide value to you.

And absolutely don’t do the follow unfollow thing. That’s just gross.
xoxo
If you’re struggling to figure out who your target audience/market is and how to reach them on Pinterest, the Resource Library is for you! In it you’ll find a pdf worksheet to help you define your target audience and lots and lots of video tutorials for how to uplevel your Pinterest strategy so you actually reach your audience! 

 

Stop treating Pinterest like Instagram! Why you SHOULDN'T be following people back!
blogpic icon

Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

A Course Review for Board Booster BOSS

In August, our shiny new course was released on Thinkific alongside our Resource Library. It’s called Board Booster BOSS and it teaches a complete set up for automating your Pinterest activity, in a way that is strategic and will give you the most benefit/bring you the best results.

Well we got our first blogger review back today and we couldn’t be happier! Not only did she LOVE the course, she totally wrote a rocking review that captures all the things I hoped others would see and value!

If you haven’t guessed by now, I’m not one for bush-beating or stringing people along or for you know, promising the moon but delivering only a small sad rock. If you read our core values on our website homepage, you’d see that “real talk” is one of them; I don’t sell magic solutions. I sell pragmatic, strategic solutions that work – with a little effort and some time.

But even with “real talk”, I struggled to explain how this course is different from all those other courses out there. I know it is, I just couldn’t convey it in words.

Lucky for me, Allie over at Allie Nimmons Creative, did it for us.

Because really, I don’t want you to just take my word for it. I think quality is shown best by the testimony of others. My biggest hope for Blue Fairy Studios is that others will truly see and feel the value of what we are doing  and the information we are providing, know it to be true and genuine, and to share that with others who could benefit from what we have to give.

Please visit her blog and read the course review she did for us. It would mean a lot to me and my team here at Blue Fairy Studios, because we do everything we do for you (and we know this will help make your life easier).

xoxo

 

The Pinterest Marketing Strategy for Bloggers that you can do in an hour or less each week! Pinterest for Business Tip: Have a strategy! Board Booster BOSS provides a complete set up and strategy for getting your pins seen, saves, and clicked! The Pinterest Marketing Strategy for Etsy Sellers that you can do in an hour or less each week!

Pinterest Analytics Explained: your “website” stats

Pinterest Analytics Explained: Understanding what the Website stats tell you about your pin performance.

This is part 4 of the Pinterest Analytics Explained series.

In Part 1 of our series, Pinterest Analytics Explained, we looked at some definitions for various stat parameters that Pinterest includes in their analytics section. These definitions are important to keep in mind as we go through the remainder of the series, so if you need a refresher click the link to Part 1 above.

In Part 2, we looked at the data you find under the “profile” section of your analytics dashboard.

In Part 3, we discussed the (limited) purpose and use of the “people you reach” section.

Today we are moving on to discuss the “website” section of Pinterest Analytics.

It’s important to note you will be able to see this data set ONLY if you have verified your website with Pinterest. 

For those of you that care most about driving traffic from Pinterest to your stand alone website, this is the MOST important section of your analytics dashboard.

This section specifically shows you the performance of pins that source back to your verified website.

Pinterest doesn’t make clear whether these values go on to include impressions, saves, or clicks made on repins of your original pins. While repins still link to your website, I have seen copies of pins recieve hundreds of repins from that copy and those values don’t seem to be reflected in the website analytics dashboard.

So this is a bit of a grey area. I’m inclined to say that the values you see under the website section do NOT include impressions, saves, or clicks made on any copies (repins) of your pin – but rather reflect only DIRECT impressions, saves, and clicks made on the original pin(s) on your account.

Regardless, this section of stats aims to show you how your original content (from your Pinterest verified website) is performing.

If you need a more clear, and complete, view of how your content is performing on Pinterest, then looking on your website’s at the referral traffic stats or using Google Analytics to track pin traffic to your website is what I’d recommend doing.

Unfortunately, I’m not a Google Anlaytics expert. I am just beginning to learn more about how to use it for more extensive Pinterest tracking myself – so perhaps in the near-ish future I’ll have some advice for you on this. But for now, you’ll need to do your own research on using Google Analytics, if you want more extensive data than what Pinterest Analytics can show you.

Other than the fact that the website analytics section shows you information that encompasses ONLY pins from your website, as opposed to all pins you add to your boards from other sources, the data itself reads much like the data from the “profile” section of the dashboard.

(If you’re unsure what an impression, save, or click entails, read Part 1 of this series.)

Troubleshooting your website stats:

It IS possible to experience a drop in overall “profile” stats and either stay the same or experience an increase in “website” stats.

What this could indicate is that overall you are getting fewer views or reaching fewer people, but that the percentage of your original content being seen, out of all the content you share from around Pinterest, is greater.

Ideally we want BOTH “profile” and “website” stats to trend upwards. BUT as long as the “website” stats aren’t suffering, we don’t need to get too worked up over a drop in the “profile” stats.

If your “website” stats overall are dropping, check these 3 things:

  1. Have you pinned new content from your website lately? I recommend a minimum of 2 pins per week that link back to your website. More if you’re able.
  2. Have you been pinning and re-pinning your site content to group boards daily?
  3. Are your pins visually attractive and does the text (copy writing) grab viewers attention?

If you’re getting lots of saves but not a lot of clicks:

  1. Check your pin’s visual appeal.
  2. Check your pin URL’s to make sure they aren’t broken. (Board Booster has a great feature that makes this easy)
  3. Be patient. Yes we all want people to click through to our site, but saves are where it starts. Saves are good because they get your content out in front of more and more people each time. The more people seeing your pin, the more opportunity you have to get those click throughs.

If you’re getting lots of impressions but no saves or clicks:

  1. Check your pin’s visual appeal and check for working URLs
  2. Check which group boards you are pinning to. Does anyone repin from the group board (How are other pins on the board performing?) You may not be sharing your content on boards that are very active or very relevant to your brand/biz/blog. Look for quality group boards.
  3. Check your consistency and be realistic about how long you’ve been pinning consistent content. Pins get better over time. One week isn’t long enough to gain traction on a pin. One month isn’t long enough to judge overall performance. Give it time and stay consistent.

If you aren’t getting any impressions, saves, or clicks:

It’s hard to nail this down to one specific issue, but you probably have some areas of your Pinterest set up that could use some help. Check out the resource library for video tutorials and webinars on best Pinterest practices.

Maybe you just need help pinning consistently? Check out Board Booster BOSS to learn how to streamline and automate your pinning strategy to help keep you consistent without taking up hours of your time each week.

At the very least, read the blog! There’s a TON of helpful material right here! (Subscribe to get new posts sent to your inbox.)

If you’ve got a question about your stats, visit me in the Mastermind Community on Facebook and let’s talk about it!

Until next time,

xoxo

blogpic icon

Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

Pinterest Analytics Explained: “People You Reach” Stats


Pinterest Analytics Explained: What the "people you reach" data tells you.

This is part 3 of the Pinterest Analytics Explained series.

In Part 1 of our series, Pinterest Analytics Explained, we looked at some definitions for various stat parameters that Pinterest includes in their analytics section. These definitions are important to keep in mind as we go through the remainder of the series, so if you need a refresher click the link to Part 1 above.

In Part 2, we looked at the data you find under the “profile” section of your analytics dashboard.

Today we are moving on to the “people you reach” section of Pinterest Analytics.

And I have to be honest here. I hate this section.

I know, hate is a strong word. But I really really really despise the data given to users under the “people you reach” tab.

The data is presented in a confusing way, making it difficult for users to interpret what exactly is going on with their reach, and overall I just don’t think there is a whole lot of value in this particular set of stats.

But, nevertheless, we will persist, and try to make some sense out of the insensible.

The “people you reach” data attempts to show you how large your audience base is (and how much of that audience is engaging with pins from your account).

The problem with this data set that most people don’t realize, is that the numbers you see on any given day are an AVERAGE of all daily values from the past 30 days.

For instance, if you hovered over the graph and for today’s date and you saw the value 590,333 viewers, that is NOT the number of viewers you had today. That is the average number of viewers over the past 30 days, as of today. Tomorrow it will re-average the values for 30 days prior, and so on. It’s a rolling 30 day average.

To make matters MORE confusing, you can select a window of time in your analytics dashboard to view a graph from the past 7 or 14 days (or any date range you choose).

When you do this, the number in the black box to the left will change to reflect the average of those average values.

Confused yet?

Let me break it down further. I’m going to use small numbers and a 7 day window to make it easier to understand.

Say for the past 7 days you have these values as your “viewer count”:

12, 14, 17, 19, 16, 14, 13

Each of THESE values is an average from ALL values from the 30 day span prior to each date.

The value you’d get in that black box as “avg. monthly viewers” for this 7 day window then, would actually be the average of the above values (in this case 15). This makes the value an average of an average.

Which makes this data incredibly inaccurate, confusing, and not at all ideal. The only thing I can come up with for WHY Pinterest chose to display the data this way, is to help “even out” the peaks and valleys that you would see if you graphed the raw data, and to create more of a “trend line”. Thus, giving you an idea of the overall pattern of your audience growth.

What you should take away from this:

  • Leave the time frame as 30 days, always, in order to get a “truer” value . It’ll still be an average, but the larger set of data points makes it a bit more accurate.
  • Use this section as a snapshot of how your audience is doing in terms of growing (or declining). I wouldn’t recommend to read any further into this data set than that. Do you see a growth trend or do you see a decline? That’s all you can really get from this.

If you want to get a more accurate, more comprehensive idea of your audience growth, then you actually can get this data from the “profile” section of the dashboard.

You’ll have to export the data though and manipulate it yourself to show you a monthly sum of the daily raw values. If you’re not exactly tech or spreadsheet (Excel) savvy, then you’ll want someone who is to help you with this. Or you can accept the surface-level data available to you via Pinterest Analytics and call it good.

Either way, you’re better off focusing on the data from the “profile” section. “People You Reach” data has very limited value.

Just keeping it real.

If you’d like to get MORE helpful tips and tutorials for how to effectively use Pinterest to market your blog or biz, check out the Resource Library! ALL of the goodies I ever create for furthering your Pinterest education can be found in the Library.

 

      

Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

 

 

Pinterest Analytics Explained: What you need to know about the "people you reach"