Why Group Boards Are NOT the Best Strategy to Get Your Content Seen

Why Group Boards are NOT the best strategy to get your content seen on Pinterest

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links, which means I may receive a small commission, at no cost to you, if you make a purchase through a link, which I’ve indicated as affiliate links in parentheses, like this: (affiliate link).  


Group Boards have been around for a long time, and up until this July they were an integral part of any content creator’s Pinterest strategy.

They are still around, but Pinterest has wised up to the fact that most content creators have been using group boards as a way to disseminate their content to the masses. And they’ve basically said “no more”.

Group boards, per Pinterest, were never meant to be a way to push content to viewers. Pinterest intended group boards to be a feature for pinners, who were collaborating on a project or event, to share pins relevant to that project/event with each other.

In order to get back to that original vision, and to discourage the growth of massive group boards with thousands of pins, Pinterest has DEPRIORITIZED content from group boards.

What does that mean?

Before the algorithm update of 2018, pins that were added to group boards had just as much of a chance of turning up (ranking highly) in search results and in the Smart Feed.

With the de-emphasis of group boards, Pinterest is actively suppressing pins that come from group boards in search results/feeds. Pins that are saved to self-curated, publicly visible boards, are thus “prioritized” over pins that come from group boards.

Does this mean we should leave all of our group boards?

Eventually, this might mean that group boards no longer have a place in your Pinterest strategy. HOWEVER, if you belong to very active, niched, groups where the collaborators are routinely visiting that board and repinning content from that board, I wouldn’t leave it just yet.

Because although the pins to add to that board may not be discovered in searches/feeds, they are still findable by group board members when they visit the board, and they may repin your content.

So, bottom line, what’s the recommendation? What should we do instead?

Only your individual Pinterest/Tailwind stats and website traffic can really tell you the right answer here. Just keep in mind that you can’t solely rely on group boards for your exposure now.

But you should definitely be keeping an eye on your pins and how they are performing on your group boards. If your pins are still getting repinned from those boards, if the boards themselves seem high quality, and if leaving the board(s) would cause a significant decrease in your reach/traffic – then I’d suggest that you keep the group board and keep contributing to it, until it’s no longer performing well.

Meanwhile, ALSO invest time into Tailwind Tribes (affiliate link). Find tribes that are active. Add some pins to the tribe and see how they perform. Over time, you may wish to replace pinning to group boards with tribe contributions completely.

ADDITIONALLY, be sure you are focusing on:

  • curating high quality boards of your own
  • using good SEO in all the key places
  • releasing fresh pin content on a consistent basis

xoxo


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Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

 

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