Free Pin Templates! Download NOW!

FREEPin Templates!

 

If you’ve been around for a while, you probably know about the resource library. (If you don’t know about it, you should totally go check it out!) And if you know about the resource library, you know that I try to release a new “resource” each month – be that a video tutorial or a new list of board ideas or a new pack of pin templates…

I’ve been a bit behind this year getting new things added, because I’ve been struggling a bit with the hosting platform for the library. Thinkific is nice, don’t get me wrong, but it’s a bit cumbersome to have yet ANOTHER place you have to bookmark and remember to visit.

So, I’ve been learning and working on building a separate area onto this website for library members only! And I FINALLY got it all worked out this week! YAY!!

It’s not 100% done, and it’s not as “pretty” as I’d like it to be – but it’s all there!

To celebrate, I spent some time today designing TEN new Pin Templates for you!

And guess what! They are FREE to EVERYONE! That’s right, you do not need to be a library member to grab one (or all) of these templates.

My Pin Templates are designed with built in space for your text overlay for quotes or blog post titles or whatever. They are saved as flattened .png images so you can use them as “backgrounds” in any photo/graphics program. If you’re a Canva user, simply download the image then upload into Canva – select “Blog Post” as your graphics size and select the template from your uploads folder and VOILA! JUST ADD TEXT!!

Super easy!

There’s a whole bunch more templates IN the library, and I release new ones all the time! (I’m even working on getting a professional photographer to provide stock images – so that means even MORE templates!)

Like I said, you don’t have to be a member to grab THESE free templates, which have a really cool abstract theme so they’ll work for a variety of content. But if you want more, PLUS a whole slew of Pinterest educational materials (like, how to find good group boards, and a whole webinar series on how to even begin using Pinterest in the first place, etc. etc. ) then you’ll want to become a member so you have access to all the goods.

DOWNLOAD YOUR FREE PIN TEMPLATES HERE

Thanks for being part of my community!

xoxo


FREE Pinterest MINI Course

 

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Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

Why (and how) you should now use hashtags on Pinterest

Why (and HOW) you should be using hashtags on Pinterest.

Oh Hashtags. They have taken over the internet. From #metoo on Twitter to #thisisthelongesthashtagihaveeverwrittenbecauseihavenolifewhatamitalkingabout on Instagram (yes that’s a real hashtag, go look it up), hashtags are literally everywhere. Including Pinterest.

Hashtags on Pinterest are intended to help you find content you are interested in. Because they are new-ish to Pinterest, most hashtags have been simple one or two word keyword phrases such as #giftsforher, #jewelry, #businessquotes, etc. Newer more “designer” hashtags like #nevergiveup, #bossbabe, #itsagirlthing, etc. are just beginning to show up. 

There are still lots of questions about how to use hashtags on Pinterest, but the WHY of it is easy to answer. Hashtags on Pinterest are just one more way your content can be found in a search.

How is this different from just searching Pinterest for the keyword phrase itself? I’m glad you asked!

If you were to type in jewelry, sans hashtag, you would get results based on the most popular and most relevant pins. If you type in #jewelry you are going to get results based on the most recent pins using that hashtag.

That means search results for #jewelry are going to be constantly changing. Which means unless you are using that tag on a significant number of your pins – or are planning to use it on every one of your own pins from now on – you won’t stay at the top of the search results for very long… if a lot of people are using that tag.

FYI: #jewelry has 474,559 pins tagged with that hashtag as of this post’s writing.

Okay, so what’s the recommendations for hashtags on Pinterest then?  Is it worth it to use them? 

Yes, on your own original content pins only. Don’t waste your time hashtagging everying that you repin – just tag your own stuff. Although the hashtag search results will change rapidly, it’s better to attempt to show up than to definitely not show up at all.

That said there’s a few things you can do to make hashtags on Pinterest work better for you:

First, understand that hashtags ONLY work in the description area of PINS. If you’re putting hashtags in your board descriptions, you’re wasting character space and time (for now…who knows? Maybe they’ll introduce hashtags to this space too in the future..)

Second, you do not need to use the entire 500 character descriptions space for hashtags. You should still write in a sentence with at least one keyword phrase in the description area and THEN add your hashtags to the end. Three to five hashtags is plenty, but you can add up to twenty per the Pinterest limits.

Third, you want to try to use the same hashtags over and over again so that you have a greater chance of appearing at the top of search results by having recent pins with that hashtag. Choose hashtags that are relevant to your brand/biz. I personally do not use designer hashtags, yet, because hashtags on Pinterest overall are still so new and it’s just too early to tell which ones will be good/established and which ones will fizzle out.

Now, if you belong to a group of people who are all using a designer hashtag (like #bluefairypinterestrockstars – just kidding, I literally just made that up) then go ahead and use it. But I’d mainly stick to keyword phrases, for now.

Also, you want to keep in mind that the more popular (more pins tagged) a certain hashtag is the faster your content will get lost in the growing sea of content. However, if the hashtag pool is too small, then it’s unlikely that many people are searching for it/using it and your content likewise will just be lost in anonymity.

Alright, so where do we FIND these hashtags? How do we research which ones are good/popular? 

As far as I know, there currently isn’t any database or anything keeping tabs on hashtag counts on Pinterest. (If you know of one or are running one, please drop a comment and tell us where to find this magical resource!)

The only way to know how many pins are using a specific hashtag is to go pin something. Then, before you actually save it to the board, start typing your hashtag in the description area below the pin image. A drop down box of some suggestions will pop up and tell you how many pins are associated with that tag. Keep in mind that what you see is NOT an exhaustive list.

If your tag doesn’t show up in the drop down, you can search for it in the Pinterest search bar (be sure to include the #) to see how much and what kind of content turns up.

If you’re being super serious about Pinterest’s hashtags, it’s probably going to take awhile to find the ones that are best for you and you’ll probably have to change them up every so often as new hashtags gain popularity and others become too popular for your content to compete.

My personal opinion is that, unlike on Instagram or Twitter, hashtags on Pinterest are NOT a make-or-break strategy. This is because they are not the only way to get found or search for content on Pinterest (there are a myriad of ways to be found on Pinterest). As such, it seems counterproductive to spend too much time researching and worrying about them.

Use hashtags on your pins, sure. But honestly? You can probably throw up a few hashtags (try to use the same ones over) on your pins and call it good. Focus your time and attention on creating good SEO elsewhere on Pinterest and consistently pinning quality content, both your own and from other pinners, and you’ll do just fine – even if your hashtags aren’t 100% perfect.

xoxo


FREE Pinterest MINI Course: get your Pinterest page in shape in just 10 days!

 

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Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!

How to Strategically Use Pinterest Board Sections

How to use Pinterest Board Sections, strategically for your business and marketing.

Happy 2018! Yeah, I know it’s been 2018 for a whole month now. I’m just now getting back in the full groove of things. It’s been a terrible flu season and my house was NOT exempt. :/

However, I’m back and here to tell you ALL about Pinterest’s Board Sections feature. This feature has been out for several months now, but it still seems like there are LOTS of questions about how to use them from a business/marketing vantage.

Here are some of the questions I’ve been hearing since Pinterest released the new Board Sections feature.

  • How many is too many?
  • Should ALL your boards have sections?
  • What is a good balance between creating Board Sections and just creating a new board?
  • How many pins should you put in a board section?
  • Is it okay to have pins on your board at the bottom under your board sections?
  • Do Board Sections help SEO?

After working with Board Sections and implementing them for my clients, I’ve come up with a these recommendations:

1) I recommend that you never have fewer than 15 baseline boards on your page. You definitely don’t want to section your boards up so much that you neglect to keep enough main boards on your page. So before you go combining boards and making sections, be sure you have at least 15 main boards (not including group boards) on your account.

2) Not ALL boards need sections. Board Sections work well for larger boards or very general topic boards. Your Main Biz or Blog board, SHOULD have sections to help viewers find specific content easier. Use shop sections, product types, blog categories, etc. as the basis for your sections.

3) You do not need a million sections. 3 to 5 Board Sections on a board is plenty. If you need more than that, you’re probably better off creating whole new boards.

4) I always recommend having a minimum of 25 pins on a main board. For Board Sections, I am recommending putting, at the very minimum, 10 pins into each section. Don’t make more sections than you can fill! And yes, it is OK to have pins on the main board underneath your board sections (pins that aren’t sorted into a section).

5) Board Sections DO help with your SEO, the same way keyword phrases in your main board descriptions do. HOWEVER, at this time, Main Board TITLES carry the MOST SEO weight. That is because they are directly searchable (you can filter your search by board title).

I hope this helps clear some things up! If you have a question I didn’t answer, let me know in the comments – or pop over to our Pinterest Mastermind Community on Facebook and let’s talk about it!

xoxo


 

 

FREE Pinterest MINI Course

 

 

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Marissa is a self-proclaimed Pinterest addict. She lives in a small town just outside Louisville, Ky with her husband, 1-2 kids (depending on the time of year), and their Australian Blue Heeler. Outside of her Pinterest passion, she enjoys all things autumn, getting lost in good books, and exploring the city. She is always looking for new places and spaces to experience!